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  • Michael Shepherd (7/26/2005 7:25:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply Stage

    For me, the great thing about this website is that it acts simply as a spur to write, knowing that it will usually be read. Just that. So more gets written. That's terrific. I'm hopelessly competitive, but mostly with myself - I feel that there's a huge potential for poetry which is of universal value, out there - not *my* potential or ability to tap it, but very much there. So it's always going to be myself as ultimate and most severe critic.
    Yes, I like to have feedback; praise; best of all, encouragement. But I also know from experience with the sonnets, that as footballers say, 'you make your own luck' - the more you write, the better you get at writing what wants to be said. That's the best thing of all, and it goes way beyond the critics.
    But I personally never mind 'pretentious' criticism, because as we say in teaching, 'a report is also a report on the reporter'...

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    • sheila knowles (7/28/2005 4:16:00 PM) Post reply Stage

      strange that nobody responded to this message...maybe it's a bit late and not very profound but I agree with just about everything you said...really, I couldn't have put it better myself, so I'm not e ... more

  • Max Reif (7/26/2005 8:23:00 AM) Post reply | Read 3 replies Stage

    DREAMS: Anyone work from dreams much? I was writing a poem, or having one dictated to me, in a dream on waking this morning. Every line started with the same phrase, 'The far side of the stars...'
    The only line I remember is:
    'The far side of the stars sees clouds in only One.'

    I don't know if I'll ever use that line, or if it's really healthy for me to post my dreams in a collective Forum. Maybe doing so will move the level of intimacy here to where we're all posting our dreams and working in a very deep mode together...

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    • Richard George (7/26/2005 2:21:00 PM) Post reply Stage

      I've used material which has floated into my head in a half-awake half-asleep state (which psychologists call 'hypnopompic' or 'hypnagogic') . It's often nonsensical but imbued with a strange power. I ... more

    • Michael Shepherd (7/26/2005 10:58:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply Stage

      It's said that waking dreams are prophetic. Max, may I borrow that line if I alter it a little? 'The far side of the clouds...' And Marcy - my only mild revenge on tsunami-posters is to read only ... more

    • Gol Mcadam (7/26/2005 8:29:00 AM) Post reply Stage

      Coincidence. I have just posted one of my nightmares! : -)

  • the legend (7/25/2005 7:50:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply Stage

    anyone watch HBO, russel simmons presents def poetry? its a great show and incourage everyone on this site to watch i watch it for inspiration.

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  • Jerry Hughes (7/25/2005 4:15:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply Stage

    after all that all I can say is - 'Jesus love me, this I know. So does ragtime cowboy, Joe. Cheers all, Jerry

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  • Robert Rorabeck (7/25/2005 12:10:00 AM) Post reply | Read 1 reply Stage

    Has anyone here read the Stephen King editorial that you can link to from Poem Hunter's main page? I really liked what Mr. King had to say and how he said it-that he was so possitive (even when I am so often negative on society.... I was one of the adults that stood in line after midnight to get the next Harry Potter book, which I finished the following day.)

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  • Robert Rorabeck (7/24/2005 10:13:00 PM) Post reply | Read 1 reply Stage

    I decided to post here Werner Herzog's Minnesota Declaration on his idea of ecstatic truth in film (and poetry) , which takes precedence over fact and hollywood. I found his manifesto amazing and fun and because I still can't post my poetry here, I figured why not post this.

    Minnesota declaration: truth and fact in documentary cinema
    'LESSONS OF DARKNESS'

    1. By dint of declaration the so-called Cinema Verité is devoid of verité. It reaches a merely superficial truth, the truth of accountants.

    2. One well-known representative of Cinema Verité declared publicly that truth can be easily found by taking a camera and trying to be honest. He resembles the night watchman at the Supreme Court who resents the amount of written law and legal procedures. 'For me, ' he says, 'there should be only one single law: the bad guys should go to jail.'
    Unfortunately, he is part right, for most of the many, much of the time.

    3. Cinema Verité confounds fact and truth, and thus plows only stones. And yet, facts sometimes have a strange and bizarre power that makes their inherent truth seem unbelievable.

    4. Fact creates norms, and truth illumination.

    5. There are deeper strata of truth in cinema, and there is such a thing as poetic, ecstatic truth. It is mysterious and elusive, and can be reached only through fabrication and imagination and stylization.

    6. Filmmakers of Cinema Verité resemble tourists who take pictures amid ancient ruins of facts.

    7. Tourism is sin, and travel on foot virtue.

    8. Each year at springtime scores of people on snowmobiles crash through the melting ice on the lakes of Minnesota and drown. Pressure is mounting on the new governor to pass a protective law. He, the former wrestler and bodyguard, has the only sage answer to this: 'You can´t legislate stupidity.'

    9. The gauntlet is hereby thrown down.

    10. The moon is dull. Mother Nature doesn´t call, doesn´t speak to you, although a glacier eventually farts. And don´t you listen to the Song of Life.

    11. We ought to be grateful that the Universe out there knows no smile.

    12. Life in the oceans must be sheer hell. A vast, merciless hell of permanent and immediate danger. So much of a hell that during evolution some species - including man - crawled, fled onto some small continents of solid land, where the Lessons of Darkness continue.

    Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota April 30,1999
    Werner Herzog

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  • Allan James Saywell (7/24/2005 8:14:00 PM) Post reply Stage

    yes Aaron and yes i havn't read your work and just because you post a lot of poems about the same thing doesn't mean that people will read your work
    about the same thing

  • Max Reif (7/24/2005 10:01:00 AM) Post reply Stage

    Subject Searches:
    When people were discussing the poem, 'Pigeons'-was it Sheila Knowles'? -I did a title search and found 17 POEMS ON PIGEONS!
    I just did one to see how many poems about COFFEE there are-23!
    Kind of an interesting idea, now and then, to take a 'cross-section' of poets on a given subject by doing that kind of search.

  • Lamont Palmer (7/24/2005 8:58:00 AM) Post reply Stage

    Lorine Neidecker is another rather obscure poet who wrote very short, piquant verses, though more benign and mainstream than Brautigan. She died in 1975 I think; lived on a little island all her life out west, published only two books of poetry, and wrote in anonymity for most of her life. Lotta stories like that. Of course the greatest 'unknown' was Dickinson, who published, perhaps 7 poems in her lifetime.

  • Michael Shepherd (7/24/2005 7:35:00 AM) Post reply | Read 2 replies Stage

    OK guys I just did my homework,54 poems by Richard Brautigan, discuss, compare and contrast and hand it in tomorrow or else... and thanks Aaron...

    It took me back to the 1960s of peace, pot and poetry... life oughta be fun and life's gonna be fun...his poems are short, mostly about five lines, witty because they're short, short because he's seen, had, just one amusing apercu... I read every word because they're that well expressed, kind of friendly Dorothy Parker area that a New Yorker editor might just consider for that blank page-end, then think, no, maybe too sexy - and the sex poems are laughaloud...A few of his poems, if the Beatles had set them (they're Beatle era, whatever the actual date) would be up there with Lennon/Macartney, imho.
    I lol'd at about five/six and snorgled at maybe 12/15 others. And frankly, I was envious of quite a few, as a little sometimes-truth neatly packaged. The after-taste? Witty guy, would've liked to meet him... pass on the music. Yes, thanks Aaron. There are some great forgotten poets hidden in PH. I accidentally hit on some poet writing how she was being slowly taken over by the spirit of Gertrude Stein, unrequested - I was off my zimmer and rolling on the floor...

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