Henry Van Dyke

(10 November 1852 – 10 April 1933 / Germantown, Pennsylvania)

Henry Van Dyke Poems

81. Storm-Music 1/3/2003
82. The Ancestral Dwelling 1/3/2003
83. The Bells Of Malines 1/3/2003
84. The Black Birds 1/3/2003
85. The Empty Quatrain 1/3/2003
86. The Foolish Fir-Tree 1/3/2003
87. The Gentle Traveller 1/3/2003
88. The Glory Of Ships 1/3/2003
89. The Heavenly Hills Of Holland 1/3/2003
90. The Hermit Thrush 1/3/2003
91. The Message 1/3/2003
92. The Mocking-Bird 1/3/2003
93. The Name Of France 1/3/2003
94. The Oxford Thrushes 1/3/2003
95. The Price Of Peace 1/3/2003
96. The Proud Lady 1/3/2003
97. The Red Flower 1/3/2003
98. The Statue Of Sherman By St. Gaudens 1/3/2003
99. The Sun-Dial At Wells College 1/3/2003
100. The Vain King 1/3/2003
101. The Veery 3/31/2010
102. The White Bees 1/3/2003
103. The Wind Of Sorrow 1/3/2003
104. The Window 1/3/2003
105. They Who Tread The Path Of Labor 1/3/2003
106. Thomas Bailey Aldrich 1/3/2003
107. Time Is 1/3/2003
108. To James Whitcomb Riley 1/3/2003
109. To Julia Marlowe 1/3/2003
110. Twilight In The Alps 1/3/2003
111. Two Schools 1/3/2003
112. Undine 1/3/2003
113. Urbs Coronata 1/3/2003
114. Victor Hugo 1/3/2003
115. War-Music 1/3/2003
116. Without Disguise 1/3/2003
117. Wordsworth 1/3/2003
118. Work 1/3/2003
Best Poem of Henry Van Dyke

Two Schools

I put my heart to school
In the world, where men grow wise,
"Go out," I said, "and learn the rule;
Come back when you win a prize."

My heart came back again:
"Now where is the prize?" I cried. ----
"The rule was false, and the prize was pain,
And the teacher's name was Pride."

I put my heart to school
In the woods, where veeries sing,
And brooks run cool and clear;
In the fields, where wild flowers spring,
And the blue of heaven bends near.
"Go out," I said: "you are half a fool,
But perhaps they can teach you here."

"And why do you stay...

Read the full of Two Schools

Pan Learns Music

Limber-limbed, lazy god, stretched on the rock,
Where is sweet Echo, and where is your flock?
What are you making here? "Listen," said Pan, --
"Out of a river-reed music for man!"

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