Richard Aldington

(8 July 1892 – 27 July 1962 / Portsmouth, Hampshire)

Daisy - Poem by Richard Aldington

Plus quan se atque suos amavit omnes,

- Catullus

You were my playmate by the sea.
We swam together.
Your girl's body had no breasts.

We found prawns among the rocks;
We liked to feel the sun and to do nothing;
In the evening we played games with the others.

It made me glad to be by you.

Sometimes I kissed you,
And you were always glad to kiss me;
But I was afraid - I was only fourteen.

And I had quite forgotten you,
You and your name.

To-day I pass through the streets.
She who touches my arms and talks with me
Is - who knows? - Helen of Sparta,
Dryope, Laodamia ...

And there are you
A whore in Oxford Street.

Comments about Daisy by Richard Aldington

  • Susan Williams (2/6/2016 9:07:00 PM)

    I wonder which is worse- -a girl turns into a whore or a man forgets his childhood friend he spent so many hours with and sees her after so many years and all he says is: And there are you
    A whore in Oxford Street.
    (Report) Reply

    7 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
Read all 1 comments »

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Read poems about / on: girl, sometimes, kiss, together, sea, sun, swimming

Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003

[Report Error]