Robert Louis Stevenson

(1850-1894 / Edinburgh / Scotland)

Robert Louis Stevenson Poems

201. To Alison Cunningham, From Her Boy 3/30/2010
202. To All That Love The Far And Blue 12/31/2002
203. To Any Reader 1/3/2003
204. To Auntie 1/3/2003
205. To Charles Baxter 12/31/2002
206. To Friends At Home 12/31/2002
207. To Madame Garschine 12/31/2002
208. To Marcus 12/31/2002
209. To Mesdames Zassetsky And Garschine 12/31/2002
210. To Minnie 1/3/2003
211. To Miss Cornish 12/31/2002
212. To Mrs. Macmarland 12/31/2002
213. To Mrs. Will. H. Low. 3/26/2015
214. To My Mother 1/3/2003
215. To My Name-Child 1/3/2003
216. To N. V. De G. S. 3/30/2010
217. To Ottilie 12/31/2002
218. To Rosabelle 12/31/2002
219. To Sydney 12/31/2002
220. To The Commissioners Of Northern Lights 12/31/2002
221. To The Muse 1/3/2003
222. To What Shall I Compare Her? 12/31/2002
223. To Will H. Low 3/30/2010
224. To Willie And Henrietta 1/3/2003
225. Travel 1/3/2003
226. Underwoods: Epigram 1/29/2015
227. Variant Form Of The Preceding Poem 12/31/2002
228. Voluntary 12/31/2002
229. Wedding Prayer 2/3/2015
230. What Man May Learn, What Man May Do 12/31/2002
231. When The Sun Come After Rain 12/31/2002
232. Where Go The Boats? 1/3/2003
233. Whole Duty Of Children 1/3/2003
234. Windy Nights 1/3/2003
235. Winter-Time 1/3/2003
236. You Looked So Tempting In The Pew 12/31/2002
237. Young Night-Thought 1/3/2003
238. Youth And Love 3/30/2010
Best Poem of Robert Louis Stevenson

The Swing

How do you like to go up in a swing,
Up in the air so blue?
Oh, I do think it the pleasantest thing
Ever a child can do!

Up in the air and over the wall,
Till I can see so wide,
River and trees and cattle and all
Over the countryside--

Till I look down on the garden green,
Down on the roof so brown--
Up in the air I go flying again,
Up in the air and down!

Read the full of The Swing

Sonnet I

NOR judge me light, tho' light at times I seem,
And lightly in the stress of fortune bear
The innumerable flaws of changeful care -
Nor judge me light for this, nor rashly deem
(Office forbid to mortals, kept supreme
And separate the prerogative of God!)
That seaman idle who is borne abroad
To the far haven by the favouring stream.
Not he alone that to contrarious seas

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