Weldon Kees

(1914 - 1955 / Nebraska / United States)

Weldon Kees Poems

1. 1926 1/13/2003
2. A Distance From The Sea 1/13/2003
3. A Musician's Wife 1/13/2003
4. A Pastiche For Eve 1/13/2003
5. Aspects Of Robinson 4/16/2010
6. Colloquy 1/1/2004
7. Covering Two Years 4/16/2010
8. Covering Two Years 1/13/2003
9. Dead March 1/13/2003
10. For My Daughter 4/16/2010
11. Girl At Midnight 4/16/2010
12. Interregnum 1/13/2003
13. La Vita Nuova 1/13/2003
14. Late Evening Song 1/13/2003
15. Lines For An Album 4/16/2010
16. Problems Of A Journalist 4/16/2010
17. Relating To Robinson 4/16/2010
18. Robinson 1/13/2003
19. Robinson At Home 4/16/2010
20. Round 1/1/2004
21. Statement With Rhymes 4/16/2010
22. Testimonies 4/16/2010
23. The Beach 1/13/2003
24. The Bell From Europe 1/13/2003
25. The Climate Of Danger 4/16/2010
26. The Conversation In The Drawing Room 4/16/2010
27. The Doctor Will Return 1/13/2003
28. The End Of The Library 1/13/2003
29. The Furies 1/13/2003
30. The Party 4/16/2010
31. The Smiles Of The Bathers 1/13/2003
32. The Speakers 1/13/2003
33. The Upstairs Room 1/13/2003
34. To A Noisy Contemporary 4/16/2010
35. To Build A Quiet City In His Mind 4/16/2010
36. Variations On A Theme By Joyce 4/16/2010
37. What The Spider Heard 4/16/2010
38. Year's End 1/13/2003
Best Poem of Weldon Kees

Robinson

The dog stops barking after Robinson has gone.
His act is over. The world is a gray world,
Not without violence, and he kicks under the grand piano,
The nightmare chase well under way.

The mirror from Mexico, stuck to the wall,
Reflects nothing at all. The glass is black.
Robinson alone provides the image Robinsonian.

Which is all of the room--walls, curtains,
Shelves, bed, the tinted photograph of Robinson's first wife,
Rugs, vases panatelas in a humidor.
They would fill the room if Robinson came in.

The pages in the books are blank,
The books ...

Read the full of Robinson

The Bell From Europe

The tower bell in the Tenth Street Church
Rang out nostalgia for the refugee
Who knew the source of bells by sound.
We liked it, but in ignorance.
One meets authorities on bells infrequently.

Europe alone made bells with such a tone,
Herr Mannheim said. The bell
Struck midnight, and it shook the room.

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