Wilfrid Scawen Blunt

(1840 - 1922 / England)

Wilfrid Scawen Blunt Poems

401. Why Do I Love? 4/13/2010
402. Wilt Thou Take Me For Thy Slave? 4/13/2010
403. With Esther 1/4/2003
404. With Eternity Standing By 4/13/2010
405. Worth Forest 4/13/2010
406. Written At Florence 1/4/2003
407. Written At Sea 4/13/2010
408. You Have Let The Beauty Of The Day Go Over 4/13/2010
409. Youth And Knowledge 4/13/2010
410. Zoheyr 4/13/2010
Best Poem of Wilfrid Scawen Blunt

Laughter And Death

THERE is no laughter in the natural world
Of beast or fish or bird, though no sad doubt
Of their futurity to them unfurled
Has dared to check the mirth-compelling shout.
The lion roars his solemn thunder out
To the sleeping woods. The eagle screams her cry.
Even the lark must strain a serious throat
To hurl his blest defiance at the sky.
Fear, anger, jealousy, have found a voice.
Love’s pain or rapture the brute bosoms swell.
Nature has symbols for her nobler joys,
Her nobler sorrows. Who had dared foretell
That only man, by some sad ...

Read the full of Laughter And Death


SEVEN weeks of sea, and twice seven days of storm
Upon the huge Atlantic, and once more
We ride into still water and the calm
Of a sweet evening, screen'd by either shore
Of Spain and Barbary. Our toils are o'er,
Our exile is accomplish'd. Once again
We look on Europe, mistress as of yore
Of the fair earth and of the hearts of men.
   Ay, this is the famed rock which Hercules

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