Charles Lamb

(10 February 1775 – 27 December 1834 / London)

Charles Lamb Poems

1. On The Sight Of Swans In Kensington Gardens 1/1/2004
2. Feigned Courage 4/10/2010
3. Going Into Breeches 4/10/2010
4. Home Delights 4/10/2010
5. Hypochondriacus 4/10/2010
6. Incorrect Speaking 4/10/2010
7. Lines 4/10/2010
8. Lines Addressed From London, To Sara And S.T.C. At Bristol, In The Summer Of 1796 4/10/2010
9. Moderation In Diet 4/10/2010
10. Motes In The Sunbeams 4/10/2010
11. My Birthday 4/10/2010
12. Neatness In Apparel 4/10/2010
13. Nurse Green 4/10/2010
14. Penny Pieces 4/10/2010
15. Prince Dorus 4/10/2010
16. Prologue To Faulkener 4/10/2010
17. Queen Oriana's Dream 4/10/2010
18. Repentance And Reconciliation 4/10/2010
19. Song For The C--N 4/10/2010
20. Sonnet 4/10/2010
21. Sonnet To A Friend 4/10/2010
22. Sonnet To Mathew Wood, Esq., Alderman And M. P. 4/10/2010
23. Lines Suggested By A Sight Of Waltham Cross 4/10/2010
24. On Being Asked To Write In Miss Westwood's Album 4/10/2010
25. The Ape 4/10/2010
26. The Beasts In The Tower 4/10/2010
27. The Boy And The Skylark 4/10/2010
28. The Broken Doll 4/10/2010
29. The Brother's Reply 4/10/2010
30. The Butterfly 4/10/2010
31. The Coffee Slips 4/10/2010
32. The Confidant 4/10/2010
33. The End Of May 4/10/2010
34. The Force Of Habit 4/10/2010
35. The Godlike 4/10/2010
36. The Great Grandfather 4/10/2010
37. The First Leaf Of Spring 4/10/2010
38. The Magpie's Nest, Or A Lesson Of Docility 4/10/2010
39. The Mimic Harlequin 4/10/2010
40. The Rook And The Sparrows 4/10/2010
Best Poem of Charles Lamb

Anger

Anger in its time and place
May assume a kind of grace.
It must have some reason in it,
And not last beyond a minute.
If to further lengths it go,
It does into malice grow.
'Tis the difference that we see
'Twixt the serpent and the bee.
If the latter you provoke,
It inflicts a hasty stroke,
Puts you to some little pain,
But it never stings again.
Close in tufted bush or brake
Lurks the poison-swellëd snake
Nursing up his cherished wrath;
In the purlieux of his path,
In the cold, or in the warm,
Mean him good, or mean him harm,
Whensoever ...

Read the full of Anger

Hester

WHEN maidens such as Hester die
Their place ye may not well supply,
Though ye among a thousand try
   With vain endeavour.

A month or more hath she been dead,
Yet cannot I by force be led
To think upon the wormy bed
   And her together.

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