Madison Julius Cawein

(1865-1914 / the United States)

Madison Julius Cawein Poems

1. Abandoned 9/21/2010
2. After Long Grief 9/21/2010
3. After The Rain 9/21/2010
4. Amadis And Oriana 9/21/2010
5. Apocalypse 9/21/2010
6. Argonauts 9/21/2010
7. Assumption 9/21/2010
8. At Sunset 9/21/2010
9. At The End Of The Road 9/21/2010
10. Attainment 9/21/2010
11. Aubade 9/21/2010
12. Autumn Sorrow 9/21/2010
13. Ballad Of Low-Lie-Down 9/21/2010
14. Bare Boughs 9/21/2010
15. Beautiful-Bosomed, O Night 9/21/2010
16. Beauty And Art 9/21/2010
17. Before The Rain 9/21/2010
18. Here Is The Place Where Loveliness Keeps House 9/20/2010
19. The Morn That Breaks Its Heart Of Gold 9/20/2010
20. A Belgian Christmas 9/20/2010
21. A Dreamer Of Dreams 9/20/2010
22. A Ghost Of Yesterday 9/20/2010
23. A Maid Who Died Old 9/20/2010
24. A Niello 9/20/2010
25. The Soul 9/20/2010
26. A Twilight Moth 9/21/2010
27. Comradery 9/21/2010
28. Death 9/21/2010
29. Deep In The Forest 9/21/2010
30. Hymn To Spiritual Desire 9/21/2010
31. In A Garden 9/21/2010
32. In Arcady 9/21/2010
33. In May 9/21/2010
34. In Pearl And Gold 9/21/2010
35. In The Lane 9/21/2010
36. In The Shadow Of The Beeches 9/21/2010
37. In The Wood 9/21/2010
38. Intimations Of The Beautiful 9/21/2010
39. Ku Klux 9/21/2010
40. Laus Deo 9/21/2010
Best Poem of Madison Julius Cawein

A Yellow Rose

The old gate clicks, and down the walk,
Between clove-pink and hollyhock,
Still young of face though gray of lock,
Among her garden's flowers she goes
At evening's close,
Deep in her hair a yellow rose.

The old house shows one gable-peak
Above its trees; and sage and leek
Blend with the rose their scents: the creek,
Leaf-hidden, past the garden flows,
That on it snows
Pale petals of the yellow rose.

The crickets pipe in dewy damps;
And everywhere the fireflies' lamps
Flame like the lights of Faery camps;
While, overhead, the soft sky ...

Read the full of A Yellow Rose

An Anemone

'Teach me the wisdom of thy beauty, pray,
That, being thus wise, I may aspire to see
What beauty is, whence, why, and in what way
Immortal, yet how mortal utterly:
For, shrinking loveliness, thy brow of day
Pleads plaintive as a prayer, anemone.

'Teach me wood-wisdom, I am petulant:
Thou hast the wildness of a Dryad's eyes,

[Report Error]