Matthew Arnold

(1822-1888 / Middlesex / England)

Matthew Arnold Poems

1. The Charge 9/9/2013
2. The Good Shepherd With The Kid 4/2/2010
3. Tristram And Iseult 4/2/2010
4. The Church Of Brou 4/2/2010
5. The Better Part 4/2/2010
6. Saint Brandan 4/2/2010
7. Revolutions 4/2/2010
8. Youth's Agitations 4/2/2010
9. Kaiser Dead 4/2/2010
10. Geist's Grave 4/2/2010
11. Mycerinus 5/6/2001
12. Epilogue To Lessing's Laocooen 4/2/2010
13. Obermann Once More 5/6/2001
14. The Strayed Reveller 12/31/2002
15. Austerity Of Poetry 4/2/2010
16. To A Republican Friend 12/31/2002
17. Stanzas From The Grande Chartreuse 5/6/2001
18. Philomela 5/6/2001
19. Worldly Place 5/6/2001
20. The Song Of Empedocles 1/13/2003
21. The Song Of Callicles 12/31/2002
22. Youth And Calm 5/6/2001
23. West London 12/31/2002
24. The Pagan World 12/31/2002
25. Palladium 5/6/2001
26. Desire 4/2/2010
27. Human Life 4/2/2010
28. Cadmus And Harmonia 5/6/2001
29. Progress 1/1/2004
30. Thyrsis A Monody 5/6/2001
31. The Voice 12/31/2002
32. Apollo Musagetes 5/6/2001
33. Requiescat 5/6/2001
34. Sohrab And Rustum 12/31/2002
35. Shakespeare 5/6/2001
36. Bacchanalia 1/3/2003
37. Memorial Verses 5/6/2001
38. Consolation 5/6/2001
39. Morality 5/6/2001
40. Rugby Chapel 5/6/2001
Best Poem of Matthew Arnold

Dover Beach

The sea is calm to-night.
The tide is full, the moon lies fair
Upon the straits; - on the French coast the light
Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand,
Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay.
Come to the window, sweet is the night-air!
Only, from the long line of spray
Where the sea meets the moon-blanch'd land,
Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling,
At their return, up the high strand,
Begin, and cease, and then again begin,
With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness ...

Read the full of Dover Beach

East London

'Twas August, and the fierce sun overhead
Smote on the squalid streets of Bethnal Green,
And the pale weaver, through his windows seen
In Spitalfields, looked thrice dispirited.
I met a preacher there I knew, and said:
"Ill and o'erworked, how fare you in this scene?" -
"Bravely!" said he; "for I of late have been
Much cheered with thoughts of Christ, the living bread."
O human soul! as long as thou canst so

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