William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Xcii - Poem by William Shakespeare

But do thy worst to steal thyself away,
For term of life thou art assured mine,
And life no longer than thy love will stay,
For it depends upon that love of thine.
Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs,
When in the least of them my life hath end.
I see a better state to me belongs
Than that which on thy humour doth depend;
Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind,
Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie.
O, what a happy title do I find,
Happy to have thy love, happy to die!
But what's so blessed-fair that fears no blot?
Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.


Comments about Sonnet Xcii by William Shakespeare

  • Rookie - 118 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 2:16:00 PM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out  (Report) Reply

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  • Rookie - 118 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 2:13:00 PM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out  (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: happy, fear, life, love, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Monday, May 21, 2001



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