William Bell Scott

(1811-1890 / Scotland)

William Bell Scott Poems

1. A Garland, For Advancing Years 4/22/2010
2. A Genius? 4/22/2010
3. Age 4/22/2010
4. An Aftermath 4/22/2010
5. Aubade 4/22/2010
6. Bagatelle 4/22/2010
7. Before Marriage 4/22/2010
8. Birthday, Æt. 70 4/22/2010
9. Byron 4/22/2010
10. Cardinal Newman 4/22/2010
11. Chatterton 4/22/2010
12. Christianity And Paganism 4/22/2010
13. Content 4/22/2010
14. Continuity Of Life 4/22/2010
15. Cupid Among The Maidens 4/22/2010
16. Dante 4/22/2010
17. A Last Walk, In Illness 4/22/2010
18. Ancient Forms 4/22/2010
19. Apple Gathering 4/22/2010
20. Elijah 4/22/2010
21. End Of Harvest 4/22/2010
22. Epilogue 4/22/2010
23. Experience 4/22/2010
24. Glenkindie 4/22/2010
25. Help 4/22/2010
26. Hero-Worship 4/22/2010
27. Infancy 4/22/2010
28. Left Alone 4/22/2010
29. Little Boy 4/22/2010
30. Remonstrance 4/22/2010
31. Rhyme Of Love 4/22/2010
32. Rose-Leaves 4/22/2010
33. Sappho 4/22/2010
34. Seeking Forgetfulness 4/22/2010
35. Self-Accusation 4/22/2010
36. Shakespeare 4/22/2010
37. Shelley 4/22/2010
38. Silence 4/22/2010
39. Southey 4/22/2010
40. Spring 4/22/2010
Best Poem of William Bell Scott

Art For Art’s Sake

‘Art for art's sake,’—very well,
Your picture you don't care to sell?
Yes, yes, I do, and thus I try
To paint so bright they want to buy—
‘Art for art's sake,’—then I fear
You want no sympathetic tear
From the stalls and boxes here?
Yes, yes, I do, I write it so,
A hundred nights the crowds shall go—
‘Art for art's sake,’—Heavens! once more,
You'd say again things said before?
And pray, why not? I wish I could
Stand as Shakespeare, Fletcher, stood—
Nay, dear aspirant, rather write
As Shakespeare were he here to-night;
That would be far more worth ...

Read the full of Art For Art’s Sake

A Last Walk, In Illness

Let's close the book, and underneath the blue
Stepping again where innocent daisies grow,
Sweet daisies the child's playthings long ago;
Feel the spring wind as then it briskly blew,
And hear as then we heard the shrill curlew;
Make friends with the slow cow upon the lea,
And seated on this height behold the sea.
Dear ancient sights, for me again so new.

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