William Cullen Bryant

(November 3, 1794 – June 12, 1878 / Boston)

William Cullen Bryant Poems

41. Love And Folly 12/31/2002
42. Love In The Age Of Chivalry 4/5/2010
43. March 4/5/2010
44. Mary Magdalen 4/5/2010
45. Midsummer 4/5/2010
46. Monument Mountain 4/5/2010
47. Mutation 1/3/2003
48. My Autumn Walk 4/5/2010
49. No Man Knoweth His Sepulchre 4/5/2010
50. Noon 4/5/2010
51. November 12/31/2002
52. October 12/31/2002
53. Ode For An Agricultural Celebration 4/5/2010
54. Oh Fairest Of The Rural Maids 4/5/2010
55. Rizpah 4/5/2010
56. Robert Of Lincoln 5/21/2015
57. Romero 4/5/2010
58. Seventy-Six 4/5/2010
59. Song 4/5/2010
60. Song From The Spanish Of Iglesias 4/5/2010
61. Song Of Marion's Men 4/5/2010
62. Song Of The Greek Amazon 4/5/2010
63. Song Of The Stars 4/5/2010
64. Sonnet From The Portuguese Of Semedo 4/5/2010
65. Spring In Town 12/31/2002
66. Summer Wind 1/3/2003
67. Thanatopsis 5/13/2001
68. The African Chief 4/5/2010
69. The Ages 4/5/2010
70. The Alcayde Of Molina 4/5/2010
71. The Antiquity Of Freedom 4/5/2010
72. The Arctic Lover 4/5/2010
73. The Battle-Field 4/5/2010
74. The Burial Place 4/5/2010
75. The Child's Funeral 4/5/2010
76. The Conjunction Of Jupiter And Venus 4/5/2010
77. The Conqueror’s Grave 4/5/2010
78. The Constellations 1/3/2003
79. The Count Of Griers 4/5/2010
80. The Crowded Street 4/5/2010
Best Poem of William Cullen Bryant

Thanatopsis

To him who in the love of nature holds
Communion with her visible forms, she speaks
A various language; for his gayer hours
She has a voice of gladness, and a smile
And eloquence of beauty; and she glides
Into his darker musings, with a mild
And healing sympathy that steals away
Their sharpness ere he is aware. When thoughts
Of the last bitter hour come like a blight
Over thy spirit, and sad images
Of the stern agony, and shroud, and pall,
And breathless darkness, and the narrow house,
Make thee to shudder, and grow sick at heart;--
Go forth, under the ...

Read the full of Thanatopsis

The Gladness Of Nature

Is this a time to be cloudy and sad,
When our mother Nature laughs around;
When even the deep blue heavens look glad,
And gladness breathes from the blossoming ground?

There are notes of joy from the hang-bird and wren,
And the gossip of swallows through all the sky;
The ground-squirrel gaily chirps by his den,
And the wilding bee hums merrily by.

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