Anonymous


Anonymous Poems

1. A Hymn To The Virgin 1/4/2003
2. A Lyke-Wake Dirge 1/4/2003
3. A Riddle 1/3/2003
4. Advice To A Lover 1/3/2003
5. Alison 1/4/2003
6. Although things are not perfect 11/10/2015
7. Angelica The Doorkeeper 1/3/2003
8. As Ye Came From The Holy Land 1/4/2003
9. At Liberty I Sit And See 1/3/2003
10. Balow 1/4/2003
11. Barbara Allen's Cruelty 1/4/2003
12. Binnorie 1/4/2003
13. Blow, Northern Wind 1/4/2003
14. Carol 1/4/2003
15. Christmas is Coming 12/14/2015
16. Christmas Presents 12/14/2015
17. Clerk Saunders 1/3/2003
18. Complaint Of The Absence Of Her Lover Being Upon The Sea 1/4/2003
19. Courage 1/3/2015
20. Cradle Song 1/4/2003
21. Cuckoo Song 1/4/2003
22. Death Of An Innocent 3/21/2015
23. Devotion, Captain Tobias Hume's The First Part Of Airs, &C. 1/4/2003
24. Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 1/20/2003
25. Edom O' Gordon 1/4/2003
26. Edom O'Gordon 1/3/2003
27. Edward, Edward 1/4/2003
28. Emare 10/27/2015
29. Epilogue To The Padlock 8/11/2015
30. Erle of Tolous 10/27/2015
31. Fair Annie 1/4/2003
32. Fair Helen 1/3/2003
33. Frankie And Johnnie 1/3/2003
34. God And The Soldier 1/3/2003
35. Godfrey Gordon 1/3/2003
36. Helen Of Kirconnell 1/4/2003
37. Hey Nonny No! 1/4/2003
38. I Don'T Want To Die 1/3/2003
39. I Eat My Peas with Honey 7/22/2015
40. I Have A Gentil Cock 1/3/2003
Best Poem of Anonymous

Courage

Courage is the strength to stand up
When it's easier to fall down and lose hold.

It is the conviction to explore new horizons
When it's easier to believe what we've been told.

Courage is the desire to maintain our integrity
When it's easier to look the other way.

It is feeling happy and alive, and moving forward
When it's easier to feel sorry for ourselves and stay.

Courage is the will to shape our world
When it's easier to let someone else do it for us.

It is the recognition that none of us are perfect
When it's easier to criticize others ...

Read the full of Courage

Edom O'Gordon

It fell about the Martinmas,
When the wind blew shrill and cauld,
Said Edom o' Gordon to his men,
'We maun draw to a hauld.

'And whatna hauld sall we draw to,
My merry men and me?
We will gae to the house of the Rodes,
To see that fair ladye.'

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