Charlotte Smith

(4 May 1749 – 28 October 1806 / London)

Charlotte Smith
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Charlotte Turner Smith was an English Romantic poet and novelist. She initiated a revival of the English sonnet, helped establish the conventions of Gothic fiction, and wrote political novels of sensibility.

Smith was born into a wealthy family and received a typical education for a woman during the late 18th century. However, her father's reckless spending forced her to marry early. In a marriage that she later described as prostitution, she was given by her father to the violent and profligate Benjamin Smith. Their marriage was deeply unhappy, although they had twelve children together. Charlotte joined Benjamin in debtor's prison, where she wrote her first book of poetry, ... more »

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  • ''I knew I had to do it. It was an order from the coach.''
    Charlotte Smith (b. 1974), U.S. college basketball player. As quoted in the New York Times, p. C7 (April 3, 1994). On shooting a three-point baske...
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Comments about Charlotte Smith

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  • Rookie - 0 Points Peter Bolton (2/25/2014 2:09:00 PM)

    Maybe one was also always writing verse as a child and sneakily submitting some of it to magazines but not many of us were forcibly married at 15. I also love her novels.

  • Veteran Poet - 1,182 Points Joseph Harlacher (2/22/2014 2:06:00 PM)

    too much! I too did not start writing until I was in debt and living in subsidized housing she writes simultaneous emotions in a single moment. I like. my Chevy S10 truck is called Charolite

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Best Poem of Charlotte Smith

Sonnet Lxvi: The Night-Flood Rakes

The night-flood rakes upon the stony shore;
Along the rugged cliffs and chalky caves
Mourns the hoarse Ocean, seeming to deplore
All that are buried in his restless waves—
Mined by corrosive tides, the hollow rock
Falls prone, and rushing from its turfy height,
Shakes the broad beach with long-resounding shock,
Loud thundering on the ear of sullen Night;
Above the desolate and stormy deep,
Gleams the wan Moon, by floating mist opprest;
Yet here while youth, and health, and labour sleep,
Alone I wander—Calm untroubled rest,
"Nature's soft nurse," deserts the...

Read the full of Sonnet Lxvi: The Night-Flood Rakes
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