Daniel Brick

Gold Star - 13,875 Points [none] (June 10,1947 / St. Paul MN)

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I was born in the late 1940s which makes me one of the BABY-BOOMERS. But we could also have been called PEACE-BABIES, because that's why so many of our parents wanted
to start families - a horrendous war had ended in total victory and the Great Depression had been replaced by the New Prosperity. My parents, from lower middle backgrounds, benefited from this prosperity and were truly grateful ... more »

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Comments about Daniel Brick

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  • Gold Star - 33,666 Points Fabrizio Frosini (6/1/2015 6:08:00 PM)

    E-books published:

    - At The Crossing Of Seven Winds (Anthology of Poetry) .

    - Nine Tales Of Creation (Anthology of Poetry) .

    - Scattering Dreams & Tales (Anthology of Poetry) .

  • Gold Star - 33,666 Points Fabrizio Frosini (5/19/2015 7:39:00 AM)

    dear Daniel, when I read your comment,3 days ago, I had no time to reply. Then I have lived till now with the (wrong) thought that I did answer your comment.. Only now, looking at the comments on NOCTURNAL SNOWING, I've realized how wrong I was.. Well, these few words are just to thank you. Poem Hunter has given me the chance to meet you (on this web site) and share with you our common passion for Poetry [and Classical Music]. You are a real Poet and a great Soul. Our daily exchange of mails is both a pleasure and a cultural enrichment.. And from them,2 Anthologies of Poetry were born (AT THE CROSSING OF SEVEN WINDS and NINE TALES OF CREATION) .. the 1st is already an ebook; the 2nd is ready to become such in a few days.. And we won't stop here..! ;)
    Thanks for your bright (and kind) commentaries but first of all, dear Daniel, thanks for your friendship.

  • Gold Star - 10,604 Points Frank Avon (2/2/2015 10:57:00 PM)

    Brick's poems are sensitive, well-crafted, and engaging. Up to this point, I have not included a PH poet among my favorite poets, simply because most of us do not live up to these classics. I'm about to make an exception and include Brick, but at this point I can't decide which of his many poems to include in my list of favorite ones.

    Furthermore, his comments on the poems of others are likewise sensitive, well-crafted, and engaging - much more so than most others. I can attest that, not only are his comments richly perceptive and interpretative, they are also thoughtful (in both senses of that important word) . He is generous in his praise, genially personable in his responses, and yet shrewdly critical in what he chooses to focus on. Rarely, if ever, is he negative (a lesson many of us should learn) , yet one can learn a lot by noticing what he chooses to comment on and what he chooses not to mention.

    He is a valuable member of the PoemHunter community. Even his bio is both informative and inspiring, itself a small work of art.

  • Freshman - 931 Points Magdalena Biela (1/17/2015 10:44:00 AM)

    Words are such perfect traitors...This sentence should become a quote to be quoted by many...I read your poems, Mr. Daniel, and I may say that if you take all of them, break the puzzle and find their order, their own place in your wonderful mind, a sort of continuity, break the poem like building and turn them all into a novel, you would have a masterpiece: a novel written lyrically, deeper than an epic poem, a novel that could say in one hundred pages more and better then a thousand. And now I apologies for my humble opinion...Deeply impressed by your power of suggestion, the way you master the words, your knowledge of comparative literature and poetry. Good luck with your creative self and be always loved by Muses! Magdalena.

  • Gold Star - 30,534 Points Valsa George (1/15/2015 4:14:00 AM)

    I love reading the poems of Daniel Brick. Even after they are read, they linger long and resonate in our mind with the beauty of the setting, the sensitivity of the characters he creates and their wide humanistic appeal! His poems range from the incidental to the epic, depicting Nature in changing seasons and moods, men in love, men after the ultimate meaning and mystery of life, their struggle and simple pleasures. There is always a harmonious fusion of the inner and outer landscape. His wide reading goes into the making of his poems and there are cross references to the works of the writers and bards of renown which make his poems erudite and classical. Yet his diction is lucid and simple and his poems very engaging, conversing directly to our soul!
    As a critic, he is nonpareil....He undertakes to read each poem with the passion and fervour of a connoisseur of art and gives wider dimensions and newer perspectives of appreciation which make his critique a delight to read! I wish him all success in his poetic career and higher pedestals of glory!

  • Gold Star - 33,666 Points Fabrizio Frosini (12/31/2014 7:18:00 AM)

    About your poem BETWEEN STONE AND STARS

    lovely verses:

    And this old man will know
    from years of quiet prayer
    how it hurts is how it heals

    BETWEEN STONE AND STARS... è un titolo assolutamente azzeccato! ***absolutely nailed it! *** :)

    Io sono agnostico, ma amo l'atmosfera mistica (intimistica e assoluta) che si respira nelle antiche chiese romaniche, nei monasteri medioevali, nelle pievi di campagna dell'alto Medio Evo - c. VIII-XI secolo - (il termine PIEVE deriva dalla parola latina PLEBS [: gente -la plebe/ la gente semplice, di campagna-]; la Toscana ne è piena) ..
    Mi piace passare del tempo lì, immerso nel loro profondo silenzio.. ad ascoltare quel suono silenzioso che è la voce della pietra.. e, insieme, le voci nascoste delle moltitudini di persone che hanno attraversato i secoli.. quel profondo silenzio che rappresenta la voce nascosta dell'universo che è dentro ciascuno di noi..

    I'm agnostic, but I love the mystical atmosphere (intimistic and absolute) that reigns in the ancient Romanesque churches, in well preserved medieval monasteries, in those beautiful country churches (PIEVI) of the High Middle Ages - meaning VIII-XI centuries - (*PIEVE* comes from the latin word PLEBS [=people]; Italy, and Tuscany in particular, is full of them)
    I love spending some time there, nestled in their deep silence.. listening to that hushed sound that is the stone's voice.. and -in the same time- the hidden voices of the multitudes of people who have crossed the centuries.. that deep silence that stands for the voice of the Universe that is hidden inside each of us..

    Fabrizio

  • Gold Star - 33,666 Points Fabrizio Frosini (12/31/2014 7:12:00 AM)

    about your poem STILL I SLEPT

    Daniel, you say: this poem is an exercise in creating imagery and using figures of speech.

    Well, it is a very good exercise, indeed: you are a skilled, excellent craftsman, which can create different & contrasting reality with the language of Poetry.

    The last stanza:

    ******

    [Unexpectedly two great eyelids closed.
    No promises were kept, no expectations,
    met. Hope stopped, love never began.
    I awoke.]

    ******

    is particularly intriguing, so much that I could not resist the temptation to translate it..

    Well, I post here an Italian version of your own stanza (changing it a little, even the punctuation) , picturing it as a poem in its own right, with its own title... Hope you can accept it as a friendly tribute to your creativity.


    *************************************


    Awakening [* IL RISVEGLIO *]


    Inaspettatamente, due immense palpebre si sono chiuse.

    Nessuna promessa è stata mantenuta. Nessuna aspettativa
    soddisfatta. Nessun amore è sbocciato; svanita ogni speranza.

    Alla fine, mi sono risvegliato.


    *************************************


    You know, translating your lines, I've thought and thought about how to give in my language the meaning of your last 2 words: I awoke.
    You can use, generally speaking, *finalmente* or *alla fine*, or *infine*, *da ultimo*, ...

    I had first translated them with *FINALMENTE, mi sono risvegliato*, where *finalmente* had sort of a positive meaning: sort of a relief... in my opinion it welcomes the occurrence of something awaited..

    But then I opted for *Alla fine, mi sono risvegliato.* because *alla fine* is more neutral - aseptic, I'd say :)
    Tale traduzione è più congeniale alla mia indole.. Such a translation is more congenial to my disposition.. :)

    Fabrizio

  • Gold Star - 33,666 Points Fabrizio Frosini (12/28/2014 3:12:00 PM)

    Thank you, Daniel.

    I've read and read again your comments. And the two poems (the new ones) of yours - And your bio, too!

    I have to say that, reading all your words, I could not help but think of a great poet of the XX century, Ezra Pound.. You are generous and sensitive, caring and compelling. And a very good poet. Really.

    Answering your message:

    About CHINESE GARDENS: yes, I wrote a number of poems in English -not my mother language, you know. I decided to write them in your language ab initio, originally, so they are not a work of translation. I am not good in translating my Italian poems into English, but maybe the ones I have written in English are not so bad, if your comments are so good! :)
    All the 5 English poems I've posted here (at PoemHunter) are from CHINESE GARDENS.
    You have already read 4 of them (BEYOND, TENDERNESS, YOU & I, GREEN FRIED SPINACH) .
    The 5th is SESQUIPEDALIA VERBA. All of them have got an Italian version, as you've surely noted.
    Than, at PH, there are 3 more poems (COMA is one of the 3) which I wrote in Italian... About them, giving an English version is really hard fo me (read more below) .

    About your note on my poem COMA:

    1. William Wordsworth, yes, a GREAT POET indeed. The Lyrical Ballads are so beautiful.. But I have to say that I prefer John Keats. When you think that Keats was only 25 when he died in 1821 (1 year earlier than Shelley, who was only 30 when he died) and that he had published only three works.. well.. Wordsworth had a very long life (80 years) to devote to poetry; Keats just a few years, but his verses are heavenly ones..

    2. About the translation of my poem COMA into English: it's not an easy task for me. You know, I've written about 30 poems in English, but I wrote them ORIGINALLY in English. In such a case it is not difficult for me to give the Italian version. But it is different for verses which were born ITALIAN, originally. They are mine, yes - of course :) - but the intimate fabric of the poem is so deeply rooted in my mother tongue that it is not so easy to give the exact meaning when I try to translate it.. It is my fault, I know.. I'm not good as a translator!

    Thanks again - from the very deep of my heart- for your beautiful [astonishingly beautiful! ] comments.

    Fabrizio

  • Gold Star - 23,210 Points Sandra Feldman (12/13/2014 12:54:00 AM)

    Those who love poetry today are so hard to find.
    Daniel Brick, an outstanding poet himself has developed a deep comprehension and love for the poetic world so close to his heart that I think he can even feel and hear Poetry live and palpitate.

  • Gold Star - 10,604 Points Frank Avon (10/27/2014 2:10:00 PM)

    Just to add to my comment below: I have now read several more of Daniel Brick's work. They are consistently of high quality, reminding me of my favorite living poet, Wendell Berry - simple yet elegant, accessible yet eloquent.

    By the way, what a great name for a poet: Daniel Brick. It must be a pseudonym - chosen perfectly. To be born with such a name would be a blessing indeed. Maybe I'll do one of my found poems sooner or later, using names of some of my favorite poets from PH.

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Best Poem of Daniel Brick

After The Poet's Death

His poems refuse
to mourn his passing, they
detach themselves from
books, magazines, wall hangings
and float freely
in the fair summer air.

Their refusal to mourn is
steadfast. 'He's just changed
his address, ' one of his
first poems says to the new
lyrics. 'He's done this before,
searching for a better place to live.'

'And we always go with him, '
pipes a small poem, barely
audible, maybe not
completed, hardly a poem
at all. 'We are all of us
pieces of his soul, ' booms

the lordly Epic Poem
of 24 cantos. 'We must
catch ...

Read the full of After The Poet's Death
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