Geoffrey Chaucer

(c. 1343 – 25 October 1400 / London, England)

Geoffrey Chaucer
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Geoffrey Chaucer known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to have been buried in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, alchemist and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works, which include The Book of the Duchess, the House of Fame, the Legend of Good Women and Troilus and Criseyde, he is best known today for The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer is a crucial figure in ... more »

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Comments about Geoffrey Chaucer

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  • Alem Hailu G/kristos Alem Hailu G/kristos (6/9/2016 12:20:00 AM)

    Yes we have to learn to tame our tongues

  • Julia Griffin Julia Griffin (5/17/2014 5:28:00 AM)

    Some of his work I really love, this one just isn't a favourite, , though his poetry has made me begin to research more about him, brilliant man, very descriptive always

  • Jackie Gerhardy (5/17/2008 11:33:00 PM)

    Chaucer really was a bellwheter for his time!

    His work devles deep into characters and sculpts them beautifully for his readers.

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Best Poem of Geoffrey Chaucer

Truth

Fle fro the pres, and dwelle with sothefastnesse,
Suffise thin owen thing, thei it be smal;
For hord hath hate, and clymbyng tykelnesse,
Prees hath envye, and wele blent overal.
Savour no more thanne the byhove schal;
Reule weel thiself, that other folk canst reede;
And trouthe schal delyvere, it is no drede.

Tempest the nought al croked to redresse,
In trust of hire that tourneth as a bal.
Myche wele stant in litel besynesse;
Bywar therfore to spurne ayeyns an al;
Stryve not as doth the crokke with the wal.
Daunte thiself, that dauntest otheres ...

Read the full of Truth

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