John Gardiner Calkins Brainard

(1796-1828 / the United States)

John Gardiner Calkins Brainard Poems

1. A Rainy Day 9/18/2010
2. An Evening Cloud 9/18/2010
3. Epithalamium 9/18/2010
4. Extracts From New-Year's Verses For 1825 9/18/2010
5. Extracts From Verses Written For The New-Year,1823 9/18/2010
6. For The Anniversary Of The Hartford County Agricultural Society. 1826 9/18/2010
7. Introduction To A Ladies Album 9/18/2010
8. Isaiah, Chapter Xxxv 9/18/2010
9. Jack Frost And The Caty-Did 9/18/2010
10. Jerusalem 9/18/2010
11. Leather Stocking 9/18/2010
12. Maniac’s Song 9/18/2010
13. Matchit Moodus 9/18/2010
14. Mr. Merry’s Lament For Long Tom 9/18/2010
15. On A Late Loss 9/18/2010
16. On The Birthday Of Washington 9/18/2010
17. On The Death Of Alexander, Emperor Of The Russias, At Taganrok 9/18/2010
18. On The Death Of Commodore Oliver H. Perry. 9/18/2010
19. On The Death Of Mr. Woodward, At Edinburgh. 9/18/2010
20. On The Death Of Rev. Levi Parsons. 9/18/2010
21. On The Loss Of A Pious Friend 9/18/2010
22. On The Project Of African Colonization. 9/18/2010
23. One That’s On The Sea 9/18/2010
24. Presidential Cotillion 9/18/2010
25. Qui Stanstulit Sustinet 9/18/2010
26. Revery 9/18/2010
27. Salmon River. 9/18/2010
28. Scire Facias 9/18/2010
29. Sketch Of An Occurrence On Board A Brig 9/18/2010
30. Snow In April 9/18/2010
31. Song - If I Could Love 9/18/2010
32. Sonnet To The Sea-Serpent. 9/18/2010
33. Sonnet. To---- 9/18/2010
34. Sonnet. To A Lady On The Death Of Mrs. ----- --- 9/18/2010
35. Sonnet. To A Lady On The Death Of Mrs. ----- --- 9/18/2010
36. Spring 9/18/2010
37. Stanzas 9/18/2010
38. Stanzas #2 9/18/2010
39. Stanzas #3 9/18/2010
40. Stifled With Sweets 9/18/2010
Best Poem of John Gardiner Calkins Brainard

Ā;Es Alienum

HISPANIA! O, Hispania! once my home —
How hath thy fall degraded every son
Who owns thee for a birth-place. They who walk
Thy marbled courts and holy sanctuaries,
Or tread thy olive groves, and pluck the grapes
That cluster there — or dance the saraband
By moonlight, to some Moorish melody —
Or whistle with the Muleteer, along
Thy goat-climbed rocks and awful precipices;
How do the nations scorn them and deride!
And they who wander where a Spanish tongue
Was never heard, and where a Spanish heart
Had never beat before, how poor, how shunned,
Avoided, ...

Read the full of Ā;Es Alienum

A Rainy Day

It rains. What lady loves a rainy day?
Not she who puts prunella on her foot,
Zephyrs around her neck, and silken socks
Upon a graceful ancle — nor yet she
Who sports her tasselled parasol along
The walks, beau-crowded on some sunny noon,
Or trips in muslin, in a winter's night
On a cold sleigh-ride — to a distant ball.
She loves a rainy day who sweeps the hearth,

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