William Butler Yeats

(13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939 / County Dublin / Ireland)

A Man Young And Old: Iv. The Death Of The Hare - Poem by William Butler Yeats

I have pointed out the yelling pack,
The hare leap to the wood,
And when I pass a compliment
Rejoice as lover should
At the drooping of an eye,
At the mantling of the blood.

Then suddenly my heart is wrung
By her distracted air
And I remember wildness lost
And after, swept from there,
Am set down standing in the wood
At the death of the hare.

Comments about A Man Young And Old: Iv. The Death Of The Hare by William Butler Yeats

  • Rookie Andrew Hoellering (12/15/2009 3:45:00 AM)

    I'm not clear whether the 'drooping of the eye'and the 'mantling of the blood' refers to the hare or the girl. It surely makes more sense if it refers to the latter, who again leaves him emotionally high and dry.What do others think? (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Rookie Michael Speakman (9/26/2007 7:04:00 AM)

    I thought the poems 1-4 were as enjoyable as anything that I´ve read by WB Yeats.
    It´s hard to say if I like his poetic use of words or his imagery better.Wish I´d discovered his work earlier. (Report) Reply

Read all 2 comments »

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Read poems about / on: remember, lost, death, heart

Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003

[Hata Bildir]