Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

Dare You See A Soul At The White Heat? - Poem by Emily Dickinson

365

Dare you see a Soul at the White Heat?
Then crouch within the door—
Red—is the Fire's common tint—
But when the vivid Ore
Has vanquished Flame's conditions,
It quivers from the Forge
Without a color, but the light
Of unanointed Blaze.
Least Village has its Blacksmith
Whose Anvil's even ring
Stands symbol for the finer Forge
That soundless tugs—within—
Refining these impatient Ores
With Hammer, and with Blaze
Until the Designated Light
Repudiate the Forge—


Comments about Dare You See A Soul At The White Heat? by Emily Dickinson

  • Gold Star - 15,578 Points John Westlake (10/18/2014 2:37:00 AM)

    All hail the blacksmith. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: red, fire, light



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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