John Dryden

(1631 - 1700 / England)

Fair Iris I Love And Hourly I Die - Poem by John Dryden

Fair Iris I love and hourly I die,
But not for a lip nor a languishing eye:
She's fickle and false, and there I agree;
For I am as false and as fickle as she:
We neither believe what either can say;
And, neither believing, we neither betray.

'Tis civil to swear and say things, of course;
We mean not the taking for better or worse.
When present we love, when absent agree;
I think not of Iris, nor Iris of me:
The legend of love no couple can find
So easy to part, or so equally join'd.

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Read poems about / on: believe, love

Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004

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