Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

He Parts Himself—like Leaves - Poem by Emily Dickinson


He parts Himself—like Leaves—
And then—He closes up—
Then stands upon the Bonnet
Of Any Buttercup—

And then He runs against
And oversets a Rose—
And then does Nothing—
Then away upon a Jib—He goes—

And dangles like a Mote
Suspended in the Noon—
Uncertain—to return Below—
Or settle in the Moon—

What come of Him—at Night—
The privilege to say
Be limited by Ignorance—
What come of Him—That Day—

The Frost—possess the World—
In Cabinets—be shown—
A Sepulchre of quaintest Floss—
An Abbey—a Cocoon—

Comments about He Parts Himself—like Leaves by Emily Dickinson

  • Gold Star - 36,460 Points * Sunprincess * (11/19/2015 6:59:00 AM)

    ....wonderful poem, love the vocabulary ★ (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: rose, moon, world, night, running

Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004

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