William Butler Yeats

(13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939 / County Dublin / Ireland)

Her Triumph - Poem by William Butler Yeats

I did the dragon's will until you came
Because I had fancied love a casual
Improvisation, or a settled game
That followed if I let the kerchief fall:
Those deeds were best that gave the minute wings
And heavenly music if they gave it wit;
And then you stood among the dragon-rings.
I mocked, being crazy, but you mastered it
And broke the chain and set my ankles free,
Saint George or else a pagan Perseus;
And now we stare astonished at the sea,
And a miraculous strange bird shrieks at us.


Comments about Her Triumph by William Butler Yeats

  • Rookie Vincent Silvertop (2/3/2011 8:03:00 AM)

    What possitiseve trancendent free power to guide the world to a beautiful dream. (Report) Reply

    0 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
Read all 1 comments »



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Read poems about / on: crazy, music, sea, love



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



[Hata Bildir]