Dante Gabriel Rossetti

(12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882 / London / England)

On The Road To Waterloo: 17 October (En Vigilante, 2 Hours) - Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

It is grey tingling azure overhead
With silver drift. Beneath, where from the green
The trees are reared, the distance stands between
At peace: and on this side the whole is spread
For sowing and for harvest, subjected
Clear to the sky and wind. The sun's slow height
Holds it through noon, and at the furthest night
It lies to the moist starshine and is fed.
Sometimes there is no country seen (for miles
You think) because of the near roadside path
Dense with long forest. Where the waters run
They have the sky sunk into them—a bath
Of still blue heat; and in their flow, at whiles,
There is a blinding vortex of the sun.


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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 12, 2010



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