William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Cxliii - Poem by William Shakespeare

Lo! as a careful housewife runs to catch
One of her feather'd creatures broke away,
Sets down her babe and makes an swift dispatch
In pursuit of the thing she would have stay,
Whilst her neglected child holds her in chase,
Cries to catch her whose busy care is bent
To follow that which flies before her face,
Not prizing her poor infant's discontent;
So runn'st thou after that which flies from thee,
Whilst I thy babe chase thee afar behind;
But if thou catch thy hope, turn back to me,
And play the mother's part, kiss me, be kind:
So will I pray that thou mayst have thy 'Will,'
If thou turn back, and my loud crying still.


Comments about Sonnet Cxliii by William Shakespeare

  • Fabrizio Frosini Fabrizio Frosini (1/7/2016 12:09:00 PM)

    Although this sonnet follows the previous one in requesting that the woman be kind to him and take pity on him, it differs considerably from its predecessors. It takes the form of a lengthy simile in which the beloved is compared to a flustered housewife, the poet's rival is a chicken in flight, and the poet himself is a tear-stained, blubbering child. (Report) Reply

    4 person liked.
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  • Brian Jani Brian Jani (4/26/2014 9:37:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: kiss, child, mother, hope, sonnet, running, children



Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

Poem Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001


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