William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Xci - Poem by William Shakespeare

Some glory in their birth, some in their skill,
Some in their wealth, some in their bodies' force,
Some in their garments, though new-fangled ill,
Some in their hawks and hounds, some in their horse;
And every humour hath his adjunct pleasure,
Wherein it finds a joy above the rest:
But these particulars are not my measure;
All these I better in one general best.
Thy love is better than high birth to me,
Richer than wealth, prouder than garments' cost,
Of more delight than hawks or horses be;
And having thee, of all men's pride I boast:
Wretched in this alone, that thou mayst take
All this away and me most wretched make.


Comments about Sonnet Xci by William Shakespeare

  • Rookie - 184 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 2:12:00 PM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out  (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: birth, horse, pride, joy, alone, sonnet



Poem Submitted: Monday, May 21, 2001

Poem Edited: Monday, May 21, 2001


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