Edmund Spenser

(1552 - 13 January 1599 / London / England)

Sonnet Xvii - Poem by Edmund Spenser

THe glorious portraict of that Angels face,
Made to amaze weake mens confused skil:
and this worlds worthlesse glory to embase,
what pen, what pencill can expresse her fill?
For though he colours could deuize at will,
and eke his learned hand at pleasure guide:
least trembling it his wormanship should spill,
yet many wondrous things there are beside.
The sweet eye-glaunces, that like arrowes glide,
the charming smiles, that rob sence from the hart:
the louely pleasance and the lofty pride,
cannot expressed be by any art.
A greater craftesmans hand thereto doth neede,
that can expresse the life of things indeed.

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Read poems about / on: pride, life, sonnet, angel, smile

Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002

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