William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Xxvi - Poem by William Shakespeare

Lord of my love, to whom in vassalage
Thy merit hath my duty strongly knit,
To thee I send this written embassage,
To witness duty, not to show my wit:
Duty so great, which wit so poor as mine
May make seem bare, in wanting words to show it,
But that I hope some good conceit of thine
In thy soul's thought, all naked, will bestow it;
Till whatsoever star that guides my moving
Points on me graciously with fair aspect
And puts apparel on my tatter'd loving,
To show me worthy of thy sweet respect:
Then may I dare to boast how I do love thee;
Till then not show my head where thou mayst prove me.

Comments about Sonnet Xxvi by William Shakespeare

  • Gold Star - 22,106 Points Melvina Germain (6/27/2015 12:31:00 AM)

    It matters not what Sonnet of Shakespeare I read, I love them all as with this beauty..... (Report) Reply

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  • Rookie - 184 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 3:40:00 PM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out  (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: respect, star, hope, love, sonnet

Poem Submitted: Monday, May 21, 2001

Poem Edited: Monday, May 21, 2001

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