Dante Gabriel Rossetti

(12 May 1828 – 9 April 1882 / London / England)

Sudden Light - Poem by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

I have been here before,
But when or how I cannot tell:
I know the grass beyond the door,
The sweet keen smell,
The sighing sound, the lights around the shore.

You have been mine before,--
How long ago I may not know:
But just when at that swallow's soar
Your neck turn'd so,
Some veil did fall,--I knew it all of yore.

Has this been thus before?
And shall not thus time's eddying flight
Still with our lives our love restore
In death's despite,
And day and night yield one delight once more?


Comments about Sudden Light by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

  • Rookie Laura Yanez (4/23/2009 7:51:00 PM)

    It tells the truth of our existence...that time is a circle, in fact there is no time. It is just an illusion built into our days and nights by the rotation of celestial objects. I knew you before and I will know you again. This is not defined romance. It is the truth of our knowing one another which dwells in and surpasses confined thought. Love is the only thing that can open the veil, and hatred will close it. I think 'Gabrielle' saw this in glimpse and vision. Thank you Dante for expressing my personal experience, perhaps in glimpses at the turn of the light and sudden revelation that sometimes slips away. Oh, if only I could live in this light. If I did, would you tell me to keep my feet on the ground? (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: death, night, light, time, love



Poem Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002



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