Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

The Birds Reported From The South - Poem by Emily Dickinson


The Birds reported from the South—
A News express to Me—
A spicy Charge, My little Posts—
But I am deaf—Today—

The Flowers—appealed—a timid Throng—
I reinforced the Door—
Go blossom for the Bees—I said—
And trouble Me—no More—

The Summer Grace, for Notice strove—
Remote—Her best Array—
The Heart—to stimulate the Eye
Refused too utterly—

At length, a Mourner, like Myself,
She drew away austere—
Her frosts to ponder—then it was
I recollected Her—

She suffered Me, for I had mourned—
I offered Her no word—
My Witness—was the Crape I bore—
Her—Witness—was Her Dead—

Thenceforward—We—t ogether dwelt—
I never questioned Her—
Our Contract
A Wiser Sympathy

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Read poems about / on: sympathy, today, summer, together, flower

Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003

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