Innokenty Fedorovich Annensky

(1 September 1855 - 13 December 1909 / Omsk)

The Bow And The Strings - Poem by Innokenty Fedorovich Annensky

How dark and heavy’s the delirium’s embrace!
How they’re turbid under moon – the heights!
To have touched Violin for so many years
And not distinguish those Strings in light!

Who craves for us? Who, insolent, has set
In flames two faces, yellow and vexed,
And suddenly the saddened Bow felt
That someone took them and forever merged.

‘How long ago it was – as in a dream –
Tell me trough dark: are you the same one, else?’…
And Strings pressed close, caressing, to him,
Ringing and tossing in their fond caress.

‘Is that all true, that it’s enough, God blessed,
That we shall never ever part again?
And poor Violin replied him always ‘yes’,
Though its heart was sinking in sharp pain.

Bow fell silent, understanding, then,
But poor Violin still echoed its complaint,
And what seemed music to the most men,
To both of them was everlasting pain.

The man didn’t blow, till the night was gone,
The candles … And the Strings were singing, yet…
And they were found, drained of strength, by sun
On the black velvet of the sleepless bed.

Translated by Yevgeny Bonver, January, 2001

Comments about The Bow And The Strings by Innokenty Fedorovich Annensky

  • Bronze Star - 2,388 Points Souren Mondal (9/28/2015 3:06:00 AM)

    ''And what seemed music to the most men,

    To both of them was everlasting pain.''

    Really good lines.. There's a melancholy in this poem that really touches the heart... (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Friday, April 27, 2012

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