Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

A Solemn Thing&Mdash;It Was&Mdash;I Said - Poem by Emily Dickinson

271

A solemn thing—it was—I said—
A woman—white—to be—
And wear—if God should count me fit—
Her blameless mystery—

A hallowed thing—to drop a life
Into the purple well—
Too plummetless—that it return—
Eternity—until—
< br>I pondered how the bliss would look—
And would it feel as big—
When I could take it in my hand—
As hovering—seen—through fog—

And then—the size of this "small" life—
The Sages—call it small—
Swelled—like Horizons—in my vest—
And I sneered—softly—"small"!


Comments about A Solemn Thing&Mdash;It Was&Mdash;I Said by Emily Dickinson

  • Rookie - 184 Points Angelina Holmes (5/5/2014 7:20:00 PM)

    My fav lines: A hallowed thing—to drop a life
    Into the purple well— Very nice :) (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: fog, purple, woman, god, life, women



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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