Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

All Overgrown By Cunning Moss - Poem by Emily Dickinson

148

All overgrown by cunning moss,
All interspersed with weed,
The little cage of "Currer Bell"
In quiet "Haworth" laid.

Gathered from many wanderings—
Gethsemane can tell
Thro' what transporting anguish
She reached the Asphodel!

Soft falls the sounds of Eden
Upon her puzzled ear—
Oh what an afternoon for Heaven,
When "Bronte" entered there!


Comments about All Overgrown By Cunning Moss by Emily Dickinson

  • Rookie - 184 Points Angelina Holmes (5/6/2014 7:31:00 AM)

    Haha cunning moss... interesting idea. (Report) Reply

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  • Rookie Megan Donohue (2/22/2005 4:26:00 PM)

    It's about the death of Chalotte Bronte, or Currer Bell. The whole poem is talking about Bronte's life, and how her family started dying, and she eventually seized an oportunity to die and followed their example. (i.e. the bird following the flock in stanza 2) (Report) Reply

  • Rookie Megan Donohue (2/22/2005 4:23:00 PM)

    It's about the death of chalotte bronte, or currer bell. the poem above seems to skip a few stanza's, but the bird in pg two is reffering to currer bell. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: heaven



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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