Sidi J. Mahtrow


An Ode to Dr Hitesh Sheth


Once came into view
A man of tallents, not a few
For he wrote as others might
That human experiece is a given right
A right to see the world in a different way
Not as one would like it to be or to endless stay
For Dr Hitesh Sheth (no period after the Dr) as he chooses
So as not to be confused with those blue noses
That study the lint in their navel
Before exclaming, it’s a dark hole of which I alone can marvel.
For Dr Sheth has been there before
And knows Medical facts (and more)
Which he places into rhyme in an easy way
As if to say,
“Diogenes and I strive to teach
On the tree of life, the low hanging fruit is in easy reach.”

s

Submitted: Sunday, June 26, 2011
Edited: Monday, June 27, 2011

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  • Rookie - 0 Points * Stephen *king (1/23/2013 12:30:00 AM)

    Diogenes of Sinope (Greek: ???????? ? S???pe??, Diogenes ho Sinopeus) was a Greek philosopher and one of the founders of Cynic philosophy. Also known as Diogenes the Cynic (Ancient Greek: ???????? ? ???????, Diogenes ho Kunikos) , he was born in Sinope (modern-day Sinop, Turkey) , an Ionian colony on the Black Sea, [1] in 412 or 404 BC and died at Corinth in 323 BC.[2]

    Diogenes of Sinope was a controversial figure. His father minted coins for a living, and when Diogenes took to defacement of the currency, he was banished from Sinope.[1] After being exiled, he moved to Athens to debunk cultural conventions. Diogenes modelled himself on the example of Hercules. He believed that virtue was better revealed in action than in theory. He used his simple lifestyle and behaviour to criticise the social values and institutions of what he saw as a corrupt society. He declared himself a cosmopolitan. There are many tales about him dogging Antisthenes' footsteps and becoming his faithful hound, [3] but it is by no means certain that the two men ever met. Diogenes made a virtue of poverty. He begged for a living and slept in a large ceramic jar[4] in the marketplace. He became notorious for his philosophical stunts such as carrying a lamp in the daytime, claiming to be looking for an honest man. He embarrassed Plato, disputed his interpretation of Socrates and sabotaged his lectures. Diogenes was also responsible for publicly mocking Alexander the Great.

    After being captured by pirates and sold into slavery, Diogenes eventually settled in Corinth. There he passed his philosophy of Cynicism to Crates, who taught it to Zeno of Citium, who fashioned it into the school of Stoicism, one of the most enduring schools of Greek philosophy. None of Diogenes’ many writings has survived, but details of his life come in the form of anecdotes (chreia) , especially from Diogenes Laërtius, in his book Lives and Opinions of Eminent Philosophers. All we have is a number of anecdotes concerning his life and sayings attributed to him in a number of scattered classical sources, none of them definitive.[5] (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points * Stephen *king (1/23/2013 12:23:00 AM)

    Diogenes and Alexander
    Alexander the Great visits Diogenes at Corinth by W. Matthews (1914)
    Main article: Diogenes and Alexander

    It was in Corinth that a meeting between Alexander the Great and Diogenes is supposed to have taken place.[26] The accounts of Plutarch and Diogenes Laërtius recount that they exchanged only a few words: while Diogenes was relaxing in the sunlight in the morning, Alexander, thrilled to meet the famous philosopher, asked if there was any favour he might do for him. Diogenes replied, Yes, stand out of my sunlight. Alexander then declared, If I were not Alexander, then I should wish to be Diogenes.[27] In another account of the conversation, Alexander found the philosopher looking attentively at a pile of human bones. Diogenes explained, I am searching for the bones of your father but cannot distinguish them from those of a slave.[28] (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points * Stephen *king (1/23/2013 12:22:00 AM)

    Art
    Alexander and Diogenes by Caspar de Crayer (c.1650)

    Both in ancient and in modern times, Diogenes' personality has appealed strongly to sculptors and to painters. Ancient busts exist in the museums of the Vatican, the Louvre, and the Capitol. The interview between Diogenes and Alexander is represented in an ancient marble bas-relief found in the Villa Albani.

    Among artists who have painted the famous encounter of Diogenes with Alexander there are works by de Crayer, de Vos, Assereto, Langetti, Sevin, Sebastiano Ricci, Gandolfi, Wink, Abildgaard, Monsiau, Martin, and Daumier. The famous story of Diogenes searching for an honest man has been depicted by Jordaens, van Everdingen, van der Werff, Pannini, and Corinth. Others who have painted him with his famous lantern include de Ribera, Castiglione, Petrini, Gérôme, Bastien-Lepage, and Waterhouse. The scene in which Diogenes discards his cup has been painted by Poussin, Rosa, and Martin; and the story of Diogenes begging from a statue has been depicted by Restout. In Raphael's fresco The School of Athens, a lone reclining figure in the foreground represents Diogenes.[52]

    Diogenes has also been the subject of sculptures, with famous bas-relief images by Puget and Pajou. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points * Stephen *king (1/23/2013 12:21:00 AM)

    Art
    Alexander and Diogenes by Caspar de Crayer (c.1650)

    Both in ancient and in modern times, Diogenes' personality has appealed strongly to sculptors and to painters. Ancient busts exist in the museums of the Vatican, the Louvre, and the Capitol. The interview between Diogenes and Alexander is represented in an ancient marble bas-relief found in the Villa Albani.

    Among artists who have painted the famous encounter of Diogenes with Alexander there are works by de Crayer, de Vos, Assereto, Langetti, Sevin, Sebastiano Ricci, Gandolfi, Wink, Abildgaard, Monsiau, Martin, and Daumier. The famous story of Diogenes searching for an honest man has been depicted by Jordaens, van Everdingen, van der Werff, Pannini, and Corinth. Others who have painted him with his famous lantern include de Ribera, Castiglione, Petrini, Gérôme, Bastien-Lepage, and Waterhouse. The scene in which Diogenes discards his cup has been painted by Poussin, Rosa, and Martin; and the story of Diogenes begging from a statue has been depicted by Restout. In Raphael's fresco The School of Athens, a lone reclining figure in the foreground represents Diogenes.[52]

    Diogenes has also been the subject of sculptures, with famous bas-relief images by Puget and Pajou. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points * Stephen *king (1/23/2013 12:21:00 AM)

    Literature

    Diogenes is referred to in Anton Chekhov's story Ward No.6; William Blake's The Marriage of Heaven and Hell; François Rabelais' Gargantua and Pantagruel; Goethe's poem Genialisch Treiben; as well as in the first sentence of Søren Kierkegaard's novelistic treatise Repetition. The story of Diogenes and the lamp is referenced by the character Foma Fomitch in Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Friend of the Family. In Cervantes' short story The Man of Glass (El licenciado Vidriera) , part of the Novelas Ejemplares collection, the (anti-) hero unaccountably begins to channel Diogenes in a string of tart chreiai once he becomes convinced that he is made of glass. Diogenes gives his own life and opinions in Christoph Martin Wieland's novel Socrates Mainomenos (1770; English translation Socrates Out of His Senses,1771) . Diogenes is the primary model for the philosopher Didactylos in Terry Pratchett's Small Gods. He is mimicked by a beggar-spy in Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel's Scion and paid tribute to with a costume in a party by the main character in its sequel, Kushiel's Justice. The character Lucy Snowe in Charlotte Bronte's novel Villette is given the nickname Diogenes. Diogenes also features in Part Four of Elizabeth Smart's By Grand Central Station I Sat Down and Wept. He is a figure in Seamus Heaney's The Haw Lantern. In Christopher Moore's Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal, one of Jesus' apostles is a devotee of Diogenes, complete with his own pack of dogs which he refers to as his own disciples. His story opens the first chapter of Dolly Freed's 1978 book Possum Living.[53] The dog that Paul Dombey befriends in Charles Dickens' Dombey and Son is called Diogenes. Alexander's meeting with Diogenes is portrayed in Valerio Manfredi's Alexander: The Ends of the Earth.[54]

    The many allusions to dogs in Shakespeare’s Timon of Athens are references to the school of Cynicism that could be interpreted as suggesting a parallel between the misanthropic hermit, Timon, and Diogenes; but Shakespeare would have had access to Michel de Montaigne’s essay, Of Democritus and Heraclitus, which emphasised their differences: Timon actively wishes men ill and shuns them as dangerous, whereas Diogenes esteems them so little that contact with them could not disturb him [55] Timonism is in fact often contrasted with Cynicism: Cynics saw what people could be and were angered by what they had become; Timonists felt humans were hopelessly stupid & uncaring by nature and so saw no hope for change.[56]

    The philosopher's name was adopted by the fictional Diogenes Club, an organization that Sherlock Holmes' brother Mycroft Holmes belongs to in the story The Greek Interpreter by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is called such as its members are educated, yet untalkative and have a dislike of socialising, much like the philosopher himself. The group is the focus of a number of Holmes pastiches by Kim Newman. In the Rodgers and Hart musical The Boys From Syracuse (1938) the song Oh Diogenes! - which extols the philosopher's virtues, contains the lyrics there was an old zany/ who lived in a tub; / he had so many flea-bites / he didn't know where to rub. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 308 Points Shahzia Batool (9/29/2012 4:06:00 PM)

    On the tree of life, the low hanging fruit is in easy reach.”
    good character poem...inviting us to open the page of Mr.doctor. (Report) Reply

  • Rookie - 0 Points Anjali Sinha (7/28/2012 8:44:00 AM)

    woww what a lovely poem on Dr. Hitesh-my favourite and best friend. He is lovely Doctor with great skills-besides being a docotor, and poet, he is also a great yoga and karate expert. Above all he is kind, humble and benevolent human being--. My best friend and mentor. I pray to God to give him peace and happiness. Your poem deserves a ++++100 from me.--anjali (Report) Reply

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