Robert Browning

(1812-1889 / London / England)

Before


I.

Let them fight it out, friend! things have gone too far.
God must judge the couple: leave them as they are
---Whichever one's the guiltless, to his glory,
And whichever one the guilt's with, to my story!

II.

Why, you would not bid men, sunk in such a slough,
Strike no arm out further, stick and stink as now,
Leaving right and wrong to settle the embroilment,
Heaven with snaky hell, in torture and entoilment?

III.

Who's the culprit of them? How must he conceive
God---the queen he caps to, laughing in his sleeve,
`` 'Tis but decent to profess oneself beneath her:
``Still, one must not be too much in earnest, either!''

IV.

Better sin the whole sin, sure that God observes;
Then go live his life out! Life will try his nerves,
When the sky, which noticed all, makes no disclosure,
And the earth keeps up her terrible composure.

V.

Let him pace at pleasure, past the walls of rose,
Pluck their fruits when grape-trees graze him as he goes!
For he 'gins to guess the purpose of the garden,
With the sly mute thing, beside there, for a warden.

VI.

What's the leopard-dog-thing, constant at his side,
A leer and lie in every eye of its obsequious hide?
When will come an end to all the mock obeisance,
And the price appear that pays for the misfeasance?

VII.

So much for the culprit. Who's the martyred man?
Let him bear one stroke more, for be sure he can!
He that strove thus evil's lump with good to leaven,
Let him give his blood at last and get his heaven!

VIII.

All or nothing, stake it! Trust she God or no?
Thus far and no farther? farther? be it so!
Now, enough of your chicane of prudent pauses,
Sage provisos, sub-intents and saving-clauses!

IX.

Ah, ``forgive'' you bid him? While God's champion lives,
Wrong shall be resisted: dead, why, he forgives.
But you must not end my friend ere you begin him;
Evil stands not crowned on earth, while breath is in him.

X.

Once more---Will the wronger, at this last of all,
Dare to say, ``I did wrong,'' rising in his fall?
No?---Let go then! Both the fighters to their places!
While I count three, step you back as many paces!

Submitted: Sunday, May 13, 2001
Edited: Sunday, May 13, 2001

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Read poems about / on: evil, friend, dog, god, heaven, trust, rose, sky, tree

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Before by Robert Browning )

Enter the verification code :

There is no comment submitted by members..

New Poems

  1. A Halloween Haiku, Thomas Koron
  2. What a lovely night to see a star., Raymond Sawyer
  3. Lonely mirror ball., Simon Gowen
  4. NYBADET NAKEN, Gunnar Mo.
  5. Haiku 'Pebbles', miken newman
  6. Here Then Now There, Guillermo Veloso
  7. Life, Proud SugarBoe
  8. When You Had Left, Poetic Lilly Emery
  9. A riddle poem, DEEPAK KUMAR PATTANAYAK
  10. Help me please, Nassy Fesharaki

Poem of the Day

poet George Gordon Byron

It is the hour when from the boughs
The nightingale's high note is heard;
It is the hour -- when lover's vows
Seem sweet in every whisper'd word;
And gentle winds and waters near,
...... Read complete »

 

Modern Poem

poet May Swenson

 

Member Poem

Trending Poems

  1. Annabel Lee, Edgar Allan Poe
  2. The Road Not Taken, Robert Frost
  3. Still I Rise, Maya Angelou
  4. Dreams, Langston Hughes
  5. Daffodils, William Wordsworth
  6. Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night, Dylan Thomas
  7. Fire and Ice, Robert Frost
  8. As I Grew Older, Langston Hughes
  9. It Is the Hour, George Gordon Byron
  10. If You Forget Me, Pablo Neruda

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]