Edgar Lee Masters

(23 August 1868 – 5 March 1950 / Kansas / United States)

Fiddler Jones - Poem by Edgar Lee Masters

The earth keeps some vibration going
There in your heart, and that is you.
And if the people find you can fiddle,
Why, fiddle you must, for all your life.
What do you see, a harvest of clover?
Or a meadow to walk through to the river?
The wind's in the corn; you rub your hands
For beeves hereafter ready for market;
Or else you hear the rustle of skirts
Like the girls when dancing at Little Grove.
To Cooney Potter a pillar of dust
Or whirling leaves meant ruinous drouth;
They looked to me like Red-Head Sammy
Stepping it off to 'Toor-a-Loor.'
How could I till my forty acres
Not to speak of getting more,
With a medley of horns, bassoons and piccolos
Stirred in my brain by crows and robins
And the creak of a wind-mill- only these?
And I never started to plow in my life
That some one did not stop in the road
And take me away to a dance or picnic.
I ended up with forty acres;
I ended up with a broken fiddle-
And a broken laugh, and a thousand memories,
And not a single regret.


Comments about Fiddler Jones by Edgar Lee Masters

  • Gold Star - 31,888 Points Gangadharan Nair Pulingat (3/2/2015 1:52:00 AM)

    Lot of happiness in reading this poem and likes it. (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Gold Star - 5,480 Points Rajesh Thankappan (2/28/2015 10:08:00 PM)

    Nice poem. Loved it. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: wind, dance, river, red, people, life, memory, girl



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003

Poem Edited: Monday, December 1, 2014


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