William Butler Yeats

(13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939 / County Dublin / Ireland)

His Dream - Poem by William Butler Yeats

I swayed upon the gaudy stem
The butt-end of a steering-oar,
And saw wherever I could turn
A crowd upon a shore.

And though I would have hushed the crowd,
There was no mother's son but said,
"What is the figure in a shroud
Upon a gaudy bed?'

And after running at the brim
Cried out upon that thing beneath
- It had such dignity of limb -
By the sweet name of Death.

Though I'd my finger on my lip,
What could I but take up the song?
And running crowd and gaudy ship
Cried out the whole night long,

Crying amid the glittering sea,
Naming it with ecstatic breath,
Because it had such dignity,
By the sweet name of Death.

Comments about His Dream by William Butler Yeats

  • Veteran Poet - 1,073 Points Ray Quesada (8/16/2014 11:27:00 PM)

    Love Yeats. ! ! ! I feel weird thinking he died decades before I was ever even thought of. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: running, son, death, song, mother, sea, night, dream

Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003

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