Treasure Island

Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

I Never Saw a Moor


I never saw a moor;
I never saw the sea,
Yet know I how the heather looks
And what a billow be.

I never spoke with God,
Nor visited in heaven.
Yet certain am I of the spot
As if the checks were given.

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003

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  • Michael Everal (4/6/2013 9:23:00 AM)

    Last night I had a dream. I won't bore you with a description of the entire dream, but during my dream, I was on a boat in the sea. It seamed like an old sail boat. On the boat with me were two women. I was sitting close to the two women overhearing their conversation. One woman said to the other (what sounded like to me) , I sawed the moor, I'm not doing that again. When I awoke in the morning, this small detail of my entire dream was stuck in my head. The statement of the woman in my dream wasn't extremely odd in itself. But the reason I remembered her statement when I awoke was that I realized I had no idea what she was talking about. I didn't know what saw a moor meant. I can honestly say that before this dream, I have never (consciously) ever heard or read the line saw a moor. I was perplexed. I thought, if my dream is created by my brain, how could such a specific statement, that I have never experienced, show up in my dream? For a few hours that morning I still didn't know what saw a moor meant. I figured it must have something to do with sailing. Later that day I googled the words and was surprised to come across Emily Dickinson's poem. I cannot remember ever reading or hearing of this poem. Until I googled it, I didn't even know what a moor was. The message of the poem was a pleasant surprise and I've taken it as a small reminder of the importance of faith. (Report) Reply

  • Armando Fadhel (4/3/2013 6:02:00 PM)

    Pablo Neruda kicks Longfellow and Poe's butts any day. Just because he's not from the United States does not mean he can't be better than a US poet. He is South American and writes in spanish but his poems are way more alive today than any of Longfellow or Poe's poems, including The Raven. (Report) Reply

  • Darius Burns (2/26/2013 10:04:00 PM)

    Remind me why Maya Angelou is over the legendary Emily Dickinson...

    Now don't get me wrong. Maya Angelou is a wonderful, WONDERFUL poet and writer.

    But then you have to think about it. Longfellow and Poe are below some freaking 1971 Pablo Neruda guy. Pure geniuses, who's writing is still very much alive today, including the breathtaking Longfellow Petrarchan sonnet The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls, and Poe's legendary The Raven, which surpasses a lot of internal rhyme today, if not almost all. And a whole lot of other poetry too.

    Something is terribly wrong here.

    I'm just 15. My poetry is worthless. I write about Black Lodges and spirits and meaningless things.

    How would I know? Who am I to have an opinion?

    I'm not a poet. (Report) Reply

  • Andrew Quintana (8/19/2009 11:49:00 AM)

    'WHAT A BILLOW BE'
    'WHAT A WAVE MUST BE'

    I've seen both and I prefer the second one because of the flow. Other than that amazing poem. One of my favorites of hers. (Report) Reply

  • Soupy Pettry (5/20/2007 5:08:00 PM)

    What a good poem about believing in god in though theres no physical signs of him. (Report) Reply

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