Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

I Never Told The Buried Gold - Poem by Emily Dickinson

11

I never told the buried gold
Upon the hill—that lies—
I saw the sun—his plunder done
Crouch low to guard his prize.

He stood as near
As stood you here—
A pace had been between—
Did but a snake bisect the brake
My life had forfeit been.

That was a wondrous booty—
I hope 'twas honest gained.
Those were the fairest ingots
That ever kissed the spade!

Whether to keep the secret—
Whether to reveal—
Whether as I ponder
Kidd will sudden sail—

Could a shrewd advise me
We might e'en divide—
Should a shrewd betray me—
Atropos decide!


Comments about I Never Told The Buried Gold by Emily Dickinson

  • Silver Star - 7,657 Points Eric Ericson (12/24/2014 1:40:00 PM)

    an interesting look at collecting wild flowers (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: snake, hope, sun, life, kiss



Poem Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003



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