Thomas Hardy

(2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928 / Dorchester / England)

In Time of 'The Breaking of Nations'


Only a man harrowing clods
In a slow silent walk
With an old horse that stumbles and nods
Half asleep as they stalk.

Only thin smoke without flame
From the heaps of couch-grass;
Yet this will go onward the same
Though Dynasties pass.

Yonder a maid and her wight
Come whispering by:
War's annals will cloud into night
Ere their story die.

Submitted: Friday, January 03, 2003

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

Read poems about / on: horse, war, night, time

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (In Time of 'The Breaking of Nations' by Thomas Hardy )

Enter the verification code :

  • Kailan Li (6/5/2014 3:19:00 AM)

    Today, my professor introduced this poem to us in class and analysed it clearly.So I search it soon after class and I love it very much. (Report) Reply

  • Sam Wright (5/12/2012 7:23:00 AM)

    the first stanza's sombre lexis supported by the sibilance and regular rhyme scheme are a direct contrast to the loud barbaric and fast paced wars else where in the world. Though Dynasties pass is a significant line as its showing how these slower, less grand and noble activities, such as a farmer working his field, are timeless and will continue far beyond the impact and memory of wars in the Empire. (Report) Reply

  • Sam Wright (5/12/2012 7:23:00 AM)

    the first stanza's sombre lexis supported by the sibilance and regular rhyme scheme are a direct contrast to the loud barbaric and fast paced wars else where in the world. Though Dynasties pass is a significant line as its showing how these slower, less grand and noble activities, such as a farmer working his field, are timeless and will continue far beyond the impact and memory of wars in the Empire. (Report) Reply

  • Andrew Hoellering (7/23/2009 9:56:00 AM)

    The title is significant. Like a dark night, war clouds everything, and Hardy with these perennial images is reassuring us (and himself) that come the day, peace with such scenes will once again prevail.
    The simplicity of the ballad form with its abab end-rhyme scheme is perfectly suited to the content of this fine poem. (Report) Reply

Read all 4 comments »

Top Poems

  1. Phenomenal Woman
    Maya Angelou
  2. The Road Not Taken
    Robert Frost
  3. If You Forget Me
    Pablo Neruda
  4. Still I Rise
    Maya Angelou
  5. Dreams
    Langston Hughes
  6. Annabel Lee
    Edgar Allan Poe
  7. If
    Rudyard Kipling
  8. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings
    Maya Angelou
  9. Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
    Robert Frost
  10. Invictus
    William Ernest Henley

New Poems

  1. The Unabridged Treaty, Bazi alis Subrata Ray
  2. Fron(t) s, Leylek D. Sovura
  3. Ode to the Old and Tired, tallulah montegue
  4. What Sort of Judges Are They Who Conside.., Bijay Kant Dubey
  5. Morning Kiss, Matt Mooney
  6. A Conservative Guardian Can Only Do Hono.., Bijay Kant Dubey
  7. Just For Blasphemy, One Is Killing Anoth.., Bijay Kant Dubey
  8. Somtimes, tallulah montegue
  9. I cannot Forget You, tallulah montegue
  10. Haiku: Gravity Too, Brian Johnston

Poem of the Day

poet Edmund Spenser

Of this worlds theatre in which we stay,
My love like the spectator ydly sits
Beholding me that all the pageants play,
Disguysing diversly my troubled wits.
...... Read complete »

   
[Hata Bildir]