William Ernest Henley

(1849 - 1902 / Gloucester / England)

Interlude - Poem by William Ernest Henley

O, the fun, the fun and frolic
That The Wind that Shakes the Barley
Scatters through a penny-whistle
Tickled with artistic fingers!

Kate the scrubber (forty summers,
Stout but sportive) treads a measure,
Grinning, in herself a ballet,
Fixed as fate upon her audience.

Stumps are shaking, crutch-supported;
Splinted fingers tap the rhythm;
And a head all helmed with plasters
Wags a measured approbation.

Of their mattress-life oblivious,
All the patients, brisk and cheerful,
Are encouraging the dancer,
And applauding the musician.

Dim the gas-lights in the output
Of so many ardent smokers,
Full of shadow lurch the corners,
And the doctor peeps and passes.

There are, maybe, some suspicions
Of an alcoholic presence . . .
'Tak' a sup of this, my wumman!' . . .
New Year comes but once a twelvemonth.

Comments about Interlude by William Ernest Henley

  • Gold Star - 36,621 Points * Sunprincess * (11/18/2015 7:50:00 AM)

    ....nicely penned, very poetic ★ (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Monday, April 12, 2010

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