Robert Frost

(March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963 / San Francisco)

Pan With Us


Pan came out of the woods one day,-- His skin and his hair and his eyes were gray, The gray of the moss of walls were they,--   And stood in the sun and looked his fill   At wooded valley and wooded hill.

Submitted: Monday, January 13, 2003

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  • Jay Stober (1/2/2014 2:47:00 PM)

    The little kids don't see Pan because they aren't looking for him. Pagan fun and games were supposed to have been left behind in bad old Europe. I wonder what Frost would say about the current situation in his country, almost a hundred years later. (Report) Reply

  • * Sunprincess * (11/5/2012 9:33:00 AM)

    Pan With Us by Robert Frost
    Pan came out of the woods one day, -
    His skin and his hair and his eyes were gray,
    The gray of the moss of walls were they, -
    And stood in the sun and looked his fill
    At wooded valley and wooded hill.

    He stood in the zephyr, pipes in hand,
    On a height of naked pasture land;
    In all the country he did command
    He saw no smoke and he saw no roof.
    That was well! and he stamped a hoof.

    His heart knew peace, for none came here
    To this lean feeding save once a year
    Someone to salt the half-wild steer,
    Or homespun children with clicking pails
    Who see so little they tell no tales.

    He tossed his pipes, too hard to teach
    A new-world song, far out of reach,
    For sylvan sign that the blue jay's screech
    And the whimper of hawks beside the sun
    Were music enough for him, for one.

    Times were changed from what they were:
    Such pipes kept less of power to stir
    The fruited bough of the juniper
    And the fragile bluets clustered there
    Than the merest aimless breath of air.

    They were pipes of pagan mirth,
    And the world had found new terms of worth.
    He laid him down on the sun-burned earth
    And raveled a flower and looked away-
    Play? Play? -What should he play? (Report) Reply

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