Robert Frost

(March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963 / San Francisco)

Range-Finding - Poem by Robert Frost

The battle rent a cobweb diamond-strung
And cut a flower beside a ground bird's nest
Before it stained a single human breast.
The stricken flower bent double and so hung.
And still the bird revisited her young.
A butterfly its fall had dispossessed
A moment sought in air his flower of rest,
Then lightly stooped to it and fluttering clung.

On the bare upland pasture there had spread
O'ernight 'twixt mullein stalks a wheel of thread
And straining cables wet with silver dew.
A sudden passing bullet shook it dry.
The indwelling spider ran to greet the fly,
But finding nothing, sullenly withdrew.


Comments about Range-Finding by Robert Frost

  • Mark Arvizu (8/24/2015 9:01:00 AM)


    The fly that got away..... (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: flower, butterfly, silver, running



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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