Wilfred Owen

(1893-1918 / Shropshire / England)

Schoolmistress - Poem by Wilfred Owen

Schoolmistress
Having, with bold Horatius, stamped her feet
And waved a final swashing arabesque
O'er the brave days of old, she ceased to bleat,
Slapped her Macaulay back upon the desk,
Resuned her calm gaze and her lofty seat.

There, while she heard the classic lines repeat,
Once more the teacher's face clenched stern;
For through the window, looking on the street,
Three soldiers hailed her. She made no return.
One was called 'Orace whom she would not greet.


Comments about Schoolmistress by Wilfred Owen

  • Susan Williams (5/27/2016 8:46:00 PM)


    Intriguing mystery here. Wilfred Owen wrote brutally frank poems about World War 1. This schoolteacher taught about war like she was the goddess of war, relishing the heroism of the battlefield. If she had seen Owen outside her window, she would not have nodded her head at him or in any way recognized him though he was a soldier. Owen was well aware that his view was not a popular one with the mindset of certain people. The man was unflinching to have written this. (Report) Reply

    8 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
  • Is It Poetry (5/27/2016 6:50:00 PM)


    Here familia relationships
    ran hard aground on
    jagged, pointed Rock's.. iip
    (Report) Reply

  • Mohammed Asim Nehal (5/27/2016 2:01:00 PM)


    Reminded me my school days..Thanks for sharing. (Report) Reply

  • (5/27/2016 12:51:00 PM)


    ...............an interesting poem with amazing imagery written during a time of war ★ (Report) Reply

  • Edward Kofi Louis (5/27/2016 4:25:00 AM)


    Her lofty seat! Thanks for sharing. (Report) Reply

  • Moira Cameron (5/27/2016 1:13:00 AM)


    Intriguing snapshot. (Report) Reply

Read all 6 comments »



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Read poems about / on: teacher, soldier



Poem Submitted: Friday, January 3, 2003



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