William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet 92: But Do Thy Worst To Steal Thyself Away - Poem by William Shakespeare

But do thy worst to steal thyself away,
For term of life thou art assured mine;
And life no longer than thy love will stay,
For it depends upon that love of thine.
Then need I not to fear the worst of wrongs,
When in the least of them my life hath end.
I see a better state to me belongs
Than that which on thy humour doth depend:
Thou canst not vex me with inconstant mind,
Since that my life on thy revolt doth lie.
O what a happy title do I find,
Happy to have thy love, happy to die!
But what's so blessed-fair that fears no blot?
Thou mayst be false, and yet I know it not.


Comments about Sonnet 92: But Do Thy Worst To Steal Thyself Away by William Shakespeare

  • Rookie - 178 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 9:03:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

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Poem Submitted: Tuesday, March 30, 2010



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