William Shakespeare

(26 April 1564 - 23 April 1616 / Warwickshire)

Sonnet Cxii - Poem by William Shakespeare

Your love and pity doth the impression fill
Which vulgar scandal stamp'd upon my brow;
For what care I who calls me well or ill,
So you o'er-green my bad, my good allow?
You are my all the world, and I must strive
To know my shames and praises from your tongue:
None else to me, nor I to none alive,
That my steel'd sense or changes right or wrong.
In so profound abysm I throw all care
Of others' voices, that my adder's sense
To critic and to flatterer stopped are.
Mark how with my neglect I do dispense:
You are so strongly in my purpose bred
That all the world besides methinks are dead.


Comments about Sonnet Cxii by William Shakespeare

  • Rookie - 108 Points Brian Jani (4/26/2014 9:31:00 AM)

    Awesome I like this poem, check mine out (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: green, world, sonnet, change



Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

Poem Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001


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