Percy Bysshe Shelley

(1792-1822 / Horsham / England)

To-- One Word Is Too Often Profaned - Poem by Percy Bysshe Shelley

I.
One word is too often profaned
For me to profane it,
One feeling too falsely disdained
For thee to disdain it;
One hope is too like despair
For prudence to smother,
And pity from thee more dear
Than that from another.

II.
I can give not what men call love,
But wilt thou accept not
The worship the heart lifts above
And the Heavens reject not,--
The desire of the moth for the star,
Of the night for the morrow,
The devotion to something afar
From the sphere of our sorrow?


Comments about To-- One Word Is Too Often Profaned by Percy Bysshe Shelley

  • Veteran Poet - 1,428 Points Sagnik Chakraborty (9/15/2014 1:42:00 PM)

    What a simple, yet beautifully expressed, idea by the believer in free love in his usual amazingly musical lyric. PBS transcends time! (Report) Reply

    1 person liked.
    0 person did not like.
Read all 1 comments »



Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?



Poem Submitted: Thursday, April 1, 2010



[Hata Bildir]