Treasure Island

Walt Whitman

(31 May 1819 - 26 March 1892 / New York / United States)

Unnamed Lands



NATIONS ten thousand years before These States, and many times ten
thousand years before These States;
Garner'd clusters of ages, that men and women like us grew up and
travel'd their course, and pass'd on;
What vast-built cities--what orderly republics--what pastoral tribes
and nomads;
What histories, rulers, heroes, perhaps transcending all others;
What laws, customs, wealth, arts, traditions;
What sort of marriage--what costumes--what physiology and phrenology;
What of liberty and slavery among them--what they thought of death
and the soul;
Who were witty and wise--who beautiful and poetic--who brutish and
undevelop'd;
Not a mark, not a record remains--And yet all remains.

O I know that those men and women were not for nothing, any more than
we are for nothing; 10
I know that they belong to the scheme of the world every bit as much
as we now belong to it, and as all will henceforth belong to
it.

Afar they stand--yet near to me they stand,
Some with oval countenances, learn'd and calm,
Some naked and savage--Some like huge collections of insects,
Some in tents--herdsmen, patriarchs, tribes, horsemen,
Some prowling through woods--Some living peaceably on farms,
laboring, reaping, filling barns,
Some traversing paved avenues, amid temples, palaces, factories,
libraries, shows, courts, theatres, wonderful monuments.

Are those billions of men really gone?
Are those women of the old experience of the earth gone?
Do their lives, cities, arts, rest only with us? 20
Did they achieve nothing for good, for themselves?

I believe of all those billions of men and women that fill'd the
unnamed lands, every one exists this hour, here or elsewhere,
invisible to us, in exact proportion to what he or she grew
from in life, and out of what he or she did, felt, became,
loved, sinn'd, in life.

I believe that was not the end of those nations, or any person of
them, any more than this shall be the end of my nation, or of
me;
Of their languages, governments, marriage, literature, products,
games, wars, manners, crimes, prisons, slaves, heroes, poets,
I suspect their results curiously await in the yet unseen
world--counterparts of what accrued to them in the seen world.
I suspect I shall meet them there,
I suspect I shall there find each old particular of those unnamed
lands.

Submitted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002

Do you like this poem?
0 person liked.
0 person did not like.

What do you think this poem is about?



Read poems about / on: women, marriage, believe, travel, world, beautiful, death, hero, city, woman

Read this poem in other languages

This poem has not been translated into any other language yet.

I would like to translate this poem »

word flags

What do you think this poem is about?

Comments about this poem (Unnamed Lands by Walt Whitman )

Enter the verification code :

There is no comment submitted by members..

New Poems

  1. When Life Turns Topsyturvy, Toshie Nohara
  2. Oneiros, Don Prem Legaspi
  3. Ah, me!, Frank Avon
  4. The man and the mirror, Melikhaya Zagagana
  5. Restive journey away from home, Melikhaya Zagagana
  6. Paralysis Agitans, Steve Lang
  7. Think Me On That Train, Susan Lacovara
  8. Lovers, Tex T Sarnie
  9. The Big Picture, Tex T Sarnie
  10. You fill me, hasmukh amathalal

Poem of the Day

poet Rupert Brooke

If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
...... Read complete »

   

Trending Poems

  1. 04 Tongues Made Of Glass, Shaun Shane
  2. Fire and Ice, Robert Frost
  3. A Man's a Man for A' That, Robert Burns
  4. Annabel Lee, Edgar Allan Poe
  5. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou
  6. Daffodils, William Wordsworth
  7. If, Rudyard Kipling
  8. 1914 V: The Soldier, Rupert Brooke
  9. No Man Is An Island, John Donne
  10. Dreams, Langston Hughes

Trending Poets

[Hata Bildir]