Oscar Wilde

(1854-1900 / Dublin / Ireland)

Vita Nuova - Poem by Oscar Wilde

I STOOD by the unvintageable sea
Till the wet waves drenched face and hair with spray,
The long red fires of the dying day
Burned in the west; the wind piped drearily;
And to the land the clamorous gulls did flee:
'Alas!' I cried, 'my life is full of pain,
And who can garner fruit or golden grain,
From these waste fields which travail ceaselessly!'
My nets gaped wide with many a break and flaw
Nathless I threw them as my final cast
Into the sea, and waited for the end.
When lo! a sudden glory! and I saw
The argent splendour of white limbs ascend,
And in that joy forgot my tortured past.

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Read poems about / on: sea, hair, red, joy, pain, wind, life, fire

Poem Submitted: Friday, May 18, 2001

Poem Edited: Friday, May 18, 2001

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