Emily Dickinson

(10 December 1830 – 15 May 1886 / Amherst / Massachusetts)

Arcturus - Poem by Emily Dickinson

"Arcturus" is his other name—
I'd rather call him "Star."
It's very mean of Science
To go and interfere!

I slew a worm the other day—
A "Savant" passing by
Murmured "Resurgam"—"Centipede"!
&q uot;Oh Lord—how frail are we"!

I pull a flower from the woods—
A monster with a glass
Computes the stamens in a breath—
And has her in a "class"!

Whereas I took the Butterfly
Aforetime in my hat—
He sits erect in "Cabinets"—
The Clover bells forgot.

What once was "Heaven"
Is "Zenith" now—
Where I proposed to go
When Time's brief masquerade was done
Is mapped and charted too.

What if the poles should frisk about
And stand upon their heads!
I hope I'm ready for "the worst"—
Whatever prank betides!

Perhaps the "Kingdom of Heaven's" changed—
I hope the "Children" there Won't be "new fashioned" when I come—
And laugh at me—and stare—

I hope the Father in the skies
Will lift his little girl—
Old fashioned—naught—everything—
Over the stile of "Pearl."


Comments about Arcturus by Emily Dickinson

  • Rookie - 175 Points Angelina Holmes (5/6/2014 7:43:00 AM)

    Stars! Very beautiful. (Report) Reply

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Read poems about / on: butterfly, hope, flower, heaven, girl, star, father, children, time, change, child, sky



Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004



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