Alfred Lord Tennyson

(6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892 / Lincoln / England)

Claribel: A Melody - Poem by Alfred Lord Tennyson

Where Claribel low-lieth
The breezes pause and die,
Letting the rose-leaves fall:
But the solemn oak-tree sigheth,
Thick-leaved, ambrosial,
With an ancient melody
Of an inward agony,
Where Claribel low-lieth.

At eve the beetle boometh
Athwart the thicket lone:
At noon the wild bee hummeth
About the moss'd headstone:
At midnight the moon cometh,
And looketh down alone.
Her song the lintwhite swelleth,
The clear-voiced mavis dwelleth,
The callow throstle lispeth,
The slumbrous wave outwelleth,
The babbling runnel crispeth,
The hollow grot replieth
Where Claribel low-lieth.

Comments about Claribel: A Melody by Alfred Lord Tennyson

  • Rookie Zorro Rara (1/27/2005 9:57:00 AM)

    This is a nice poem! (Report) Reply

    2 person liked.
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Read poems about / on: rose, tree, moon, song, alone

Poem Submitted: Thursday, January 1, 2004

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